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Don't worry... I'm a native French speaker, and "je suis excité" isn't that bad and can be used with non-sexual things as well

Hahaha, they must think you have some great fun ;D

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Hahaha, they must think you have some great fun ;D

what kind of douchebag / posr uses 'im excited' in conversations with friends and family

I would say, someone who is not entirely fluent in the language they're speaking in perhaps?

Je suis excité sexuellement IS I'm sexually excited!

Dear readers: this was an Old FML that this user is ripping off, just fyi

lol. i'm sure they understood, though. i mean if you get sexually excited for dinner and pretty much everything, they're bound to catch on. we went on in french class saying bitch in french, because we thought it meant dog...like our textbook said. yeah...it wasn't the same kind of dog, but the teacher thought it was hilarious.

And f*ck me is pollos fritos in Spanish.

depends on the french you were taught. I was taught Quebecois french all throughout school and that is very different from Parisian french. Quebecois has its own dialect and slang...just try using it in France. Really, try it in Paris, they treat you like dirt if you do...as was an entire school group of us was treated when we were there with fluent french speakers from Quebec. Did not leave a nice impression of us of France. Italy however....Fun!

...wow i can imaging the conversations

.....fried chicken?

#132 Actually, nope. It has nothing to do with you being from Quebec or how you speak. The Parisians will treat ANYONE like garbage that just crawled out of the sewers. Heck, they'll act like that to the people from other cities of France, even! It's unrelated to language or country of origin or anything, they don't discriminate, they hate everybody equally. I'd know. I'm from Paris. In some cases, the Parisians will treat even other Parisians that way. I got so fed up of that crap I freaking moved away.

Uh? I was in Paris two weeks ago. All the people were really, really kind, especially if i tried to speak in french...(:

too bad its the exact opposite in the US, when a foreignner tries to speak english everyone burst out laughing and mocking the person

That's because everyone should already know how to speak English! I mean, there's no way in hell that any other language is on the same par with this magnificent language, and besides everyone in the world uses it to do English. whoever doesn't speak English must be an unedumacated dumbass! /sarcasm

cute, you say you're from Paris and then make a broad generalisation against us all =) you seem quite the winner.

of course. they realize you don't speak French very well, which means that they can make you pay expensive for cheap things

Hahaha, you kinda deserved that one. Should always double check before you speak!

oh yeah cause that's always practical... "how are you?" "well, i think i'm fine... but hold on two seconds till I check... nope wait, i was right.. i'm fine"

No you shouldn't, the best way to improve speaking a language is just go for it! People will forgive you for silly errors, the main thing is trying.

I think they meant check with whoever they learned it from.. Did you know Je suis chaud literally translated means I am hot, but in french means I'm horny...you have to say J'ai chaud, literally translated as I have hot. Little tidbit for the OP, don't mess that up

I'm glad to see people just love to think before they speak round here.

haha in French class one of my friends said je suis chaud to get my teacher to turn the air down, that's why she laughed... xD

Similar thing in German: "ich bin heiß" means that you're sexually excited, and "ich bin kalt" means you're sexually...cold, for lack of a better word. If you want to describe the temperature, it's "es ist mir heiß/kalt", meaning "it is hot/cold to me".

Don't worry... I'm a native French speaker, and "je suis excité" isn't that bad and can be used with non-sexual things as well

No, it can't. "Je suis hereux" is "I am excited", "Je suis excité" is "I am horny". Or at least it is in Parisian French. Québec French is a completely different language altogether.

I would agree. I'm a french speaker from la belle province.. Je suis excité can mean I am excited in Quebecois.

In Quebec, it can simply mean "I'm excited" (I live in Montreal, QC, Canada).

It's not a completely different language... it's a different dialect. Who taught you English? And you are trying to correct his French? Come on now, hypocrite.

Je suit excité=I'm excited. Je suis heureux=I'm happy. Whoever moderated this must not have known French.

Why can't we all just get along and live in peace in harmony. Or else...

to #12: I am from Paris, and a native french speaker. "Je suis excité" doesn't necessarily mean "I am horny". It can be a synonym of "je suis énervé", which could be translated as "I'm pissed" or "I'm nervous"... so many translations, so don't "No, it can't" someone who tries to explain ;-)

"Je Suis hereux" means "I am Happy". "Je suis éxcité" means "I am excited" I only speak english as a second language.

um...Stunt? What does knowing English have ANYTHING AT ALL to do with knowing French? I don't get the logical connection between knowing the exact definition of an English word and being able to correct someone's French.

Furthermore, the definitions of "language" vs. "dialect" are not as clear cut as you may think they are. Case in point: the "dialects" of Chinese are about as different from each other as the various Romance "languages" are from each other. Really, it's political in nature.

Not really an FML here in Quee-bec. When I first came to Mtl I went to a restaurant and asked for a 'poutin Italienne' instead of a 'poutine Italienne'. Good times.

Lol you know nothing of the french language if you insist that French from France and Quebec French are two different languages. The accent is different, and some words are used more in one region than in the other and vice versa. Expressions vary, just as they do in the English language if you compare England to Australia. Nevertheless, we speak the same language and can communicate perfectly.

It's not that simple, even French people can be laughed at for saying "excité" in a non-sexual way. It depends whether the context of the sentence may be ambiguous (and whether the person they're talking to is a douchebag, just like when you use the word "chatte" talking about a cat and not a pussy; everybody gets the double-meaning but some won't be able to stop laughing about that). But for instance you can say "les enfants sont excités" when your children are nervous because they can't wait to attend a birthday party or if they are restless. You can say "c'est excitant" when you talk about a new job for instance. It is not uncorrect to say " je suis excité" but it is better to find another way of expressing it ("j'ai hâte de faire cela", " je suis ravi de...", "je suis très heureux de...") to avoid being laughd at.

OH, OP, by the way, "je suis excité" will be OK, but don't say "Tu m'excites" to someone when he/she's suggested a nice activity or cooked a mouth-watering meal, because it definitely means "you make me horny".

I am Chinese (in heritage - I can understand Standard Mandarin fluently), and agree that it is completely political in nature. As China is a communist society, the government wants a feeling of national unity to pervade the country, and so call of the different languages different dialects of Chinese. They share characters, but that's about it. In many cases, the syntax, grammar, and even vocabulary is very different. (For an English approximation, perhaps one area might use "possess" commonly, while another dialect would use "have"). Beifanghua (Mandarin, a dialect family) is pretty similar from one region to another. Once you go South, though, the dialects are extremely different - a Shanghainese definitely will not be able to understand a HongKongnese without prior instruction in Cantonese. Even Shanghai and Suzhou, two cities probably as far apart as New York and Newark (NJ), have differences in the way they speak, though they are pretty much mutually intelligible. I would go as far as to say that the "dialects" of Chinese are MUCH more different than the Romance languages are to each other. Most dialects are not mutually intelligible, while languages such as French and Italian often have many similarities.

@97 - what does that mean?

This reply blew my mind, because you might be the only person who's responded who isn't completely retarded

je suis heureux means I am happy excited is like you can't wait for something do you think when they are young kids that say je suis excité to their parents their parents think "well it must means that my child is horny"

poutin is not a word, but poutine (what he meant) is a typical Quebec meal, which is French fries with gravy (I think it is) and cheese on top. there is many other kind, like italienne (if I remember it is with tomato sauce instead of gravy (I never had italienne, only plain))

Je suis hereux means "I am happy"

Thanks Captain Obvious! I never knew that!

Poutine is a meal

actually, i though je suis excite means i was excited...

204, j'étais excité means i was excited

Wow, I bet you made a marvelous first impression.

The only thing worse than a frenchman is one that lives in canada.

Maybe this is why you're making so many friends.

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You are, huh? Well, I'll be right over.

Or girl. On girl. :) Hi, Didi.

Heh, I bet they knew what you meant but were laughing their ass off.

You win so much, mercy. You must have gotten your awesome comments from your MIA dad...