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By exalia - / Monday 7 May 2012 20:40 / United Kingdom - London
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By  egc573  |  40

"My dealer told me it was a good buy." No shit! What was he/she supposed to say? "No, this is a piece of crap just waiting to come apart the moment you take it off the lot. Now give me your money." Bad call on your part.

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  airforce987  |  20

YDI, but tell him that he's buying the car back for exactly what he sold it. No more, no less, otherwise, you sue his ass. Or, tell him you'll come back with a couple buddies.

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  YourBuddyElmo  |  5

#1 is right - most states have consumer protection laws that use this exact scenario as examples in legislation. Depending on what verbiage he used when selling you the car it sounds like you have an excellent case for restitution.

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  mdavenport6  |  4

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  evilplatypus  |  33

48 and 59, it depends on where you live. Some states include used cars under their lemon laws. I can't find anything out for UK specifically, however. I hate how everyone assumes all laws are universal. Google "lemon laws used cars", the first sites you see will all tell you it depends on where you live.

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  evilplatypus  |  33

Yep, just found it. The UK version of the lemon law (statutory laws) says a car must "be of satisfactory quality. This means the car must be in reasonable condition, considering its age and make, its past history and the price paid. It must be fit for its purpose (for example, if you request a vehicle which is capable of towing a large caravan, it must be capable of doing the job). It must also be roadworthy. (It is a criminal offence to sell an unroadworthy car). A car is not roadworthy if its brakes, tyres, steering, or construction make it unfit for the road. Even if the car has an MOT certificate, this doesn't necessarily mean that it is roadworthy." So yes, they are entitled to a full refund since the car is not roadworthy, nor capable of its purpose (driving).

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  alisidewinder  |  9

There is a lemon law for used cars around here. I don't know why, but while looking up local laws it was stated there, so I went and asked a few dealerships and they said yes there technically is but unless the customer mentions it or wants it in the paper work they don't have to honor it.

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  Axipiter  |  24

50... I have that action figure. It flies with me everywhere and is currently keeping watch over my liquor supply. Seeing your profile photo made my day.

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  gonphisting  |  5

If sold in an "as is" situation like on the streets between owner and buyer then yeah there is no lemon law but this isn't lemon law issue obviously no one here knows what lemon law is

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  jvmateo  |  0

To all the people saying Lemon laws aren't for used cars...well does that make sense? On a new car it's NEW meaning there's nothing wrong with it. I don't know about the lemon law but it would be much more useful with a used car.

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  shimir  |  4

U fucking idiot, it's you idiots that fuck us over because you get paid to sell, if you don't sell, u run the risk of getting fired because your a poor salesman, but than again if the consumer is intelligent he would of checked under the car, like any intelligent person woul do, along with tasting the oil, rad coolant, tranny fluid and taking it for a test drive for any noises.

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  Il_Maestro  |  6

41 - there's a fine overgeneralization. They're hard working people just like anybody else, trying to make a sale to put bread on the table. Don't let scammers like the OP's dealer represent all car salesmen. He's just a tool.

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  evilplatypus  |  33

64 - Most car salesmen work on commission, so they have a vested interest in selling you a vehicle at all costs, even if it goes against their personal ethics. Generalizations and stereotypes don't just "pop up" out of nowhere. They're generally based on something you will find to be fairly common.

By  egc573  |  40

"My dealer told me it was a good buy." No shit! What was he/she supposed to say? "No, this is a piece of crap just waiting to come apart the moment you take it off the lot. Now give me your money." Bad call on your part.

By  eman1972  |  4

There's not a lemon law on use cars. However the dealer will give you the money back if you complain. They don't want to be reported to the Better Business Bureau.

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  rexcanis  |  10

Oh no! A non-government agency who can yell at you to give a refund! The BBB has no real authority. They basically involve both parties in voluntary mediation.

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  evilplatypus  |  33

I've gone to the BBB twice and both times it was settled in a way that made me happy. People look at the BBB ratings, so many companies don't want the bad ratings. Bad ratings = bad sales.

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  divadro102  |  16

No it isn't. Any car can be a "lemon". Manufacturers ship lemons many times. My friend bought himself a 2011 Camaro when they first came out and it kept overheating and electrical problems began and it was a cycle of bad things. Chevrolet took back that one and gave him a new one. I read the same of a mini cooper and bmw sent them a new one. A lemon isn't just a beat up old car.

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  cosmosis  |  12

It depends where you buy the car from. Here in australia, a used car dealer must give you 3 months minimum unless you elect not to take out the warranty.

By  rubberduckie94  |  13

Never buy a used car without having a mechanic you trust check it out. At the very least take someone with you that knows more about cars and how dishonest car salesmen are than you obviously do. But fyl. Get a lawyer unless you bought it as is you should be able to get your money back.

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