By siamne - 28/3/2021 23:00

Glass half empty

Today, after six months of eating a better diet and exercising every other day, I can now say that I am physically healthier, but the lifestyle changes have done absolutely nothing to help my depression. That was the whole reason I started doing this in the first place. FML
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By  Sofia Raposo  |  6

I'm very sorry to hear that. People always told me exercise would help with my depression, but it only made it worse, because I hated it. Maybe you should try something else, something that you really enjoy and used to make you happy. Try to get that feeling back. Hope you feel better soon.

By  Chazzster  |  20

Congratulations on the lifestyle improvement!

See a doctor, psychologist, or counselor for your depression. While everyone feels a bit “down” from time to time, depression is a serious mental health condition. It responds to treatment however. My own experience is that antidepressants can give fairly quick short term improvement, in the long run counseling is more effective. You can start with your family doctor to get a recommendation for a psychiatrist (an MD who specializes in mental health issues and can prescribe medications for those conditions) or a psychologist (a person trained to provide counseling for mental health conditions). If you get prescribed antidepressants try to make sure you see a psychiatrist as there are many different antidepressants with different side effects and people respond differently so you need an expert in that field. In the USA most health insurance covers mental health, but the copays are often higher than with a regular doctor depending on your insurance.

If you cannot afford a professional mental health provider, consider other options that may be free or low cost for counseling: Most schools have counselors, many business offer counseling services to their employees (go to the HR department, not your boss or supervisor), if you are a member of a church or synagogue many pastors priests and rabbis provide counseling to their members.

While friends and family can often be supportive, mental healthcare is not something most people are qualified to handle. Usually the first reaction of friends and family is to tell you to “cheer up” which is completely useless advice and what they are really telling you is really that they don’t want to hear about it. A professional counselor can provide several things: (1) A non-judgmental ear to listen, (2) Advice on techniques to effectively handle the feelings, and (3) Advice on techniques to reduce the frequency of the triggers for your depression.

Other things that can help:
(1) Journal your feelings and thoughts - I have always found that useful in helping me to sort out how I really feel and why. But be sure to keep it private away from others eyes unless they are qualified as your professional counselor.
(2) See if you can figure out your triggers that tend to lead to depression.
(3) Remember that depression, no matter how bad it gets is almost always temporary. Let that knowledge help you make it through the episodes. Do not make important decisions that you cannot readily undo while in an episode of depression.
(4) Do not become reliant on alcohol or drugs to make it through depression - It can set you up for a repeating cycle if you rely on alcohol or drugs to numb the pain which ultimately makes things much worse.

COMMENTS
By  Sofia Raposo  |  6

I'm very sorry to hear that. People always told me exercise would help with my depression, but it only made it worse, because I hated it. Maybe you should try something else, something that you really enjoy and used to make you happy. Try to get that feeling back. Hope you feel better soon.

By  Chazzster  |  20

Congratulations on the lifestyle improvement!

See a doctor, psychologist, or counselor for your depression. While everyone feels a bit “down” from time to time, depression is a serious mental health condition. It responds to treatment however. My own experience is that antidepressants can give fairly quick short term improvement, in the long run counseling is more effective. You can start with your family doctor to get a recommendation for a psychiatrist (an MD who specializes in mental health issues and can prescribe medications for those conditions) or a psychologist (a person trained to provide counseling for mental health conditions). If you get prescribed antidepressants try to make sure you see a psychiatrist as there are many different antidepressants with different side effects and people respond differently so you need an expert in that field. In the USA most health insurance covers mental health, but the copays are often higher than with a regular doctor depending on your insurance.

If you cannot afford a professional mental health provider, consider other options that may be free or low cost for counseling: Most schools have counselors, many business offer counseling services to their employees (go to the HR department, not your boss or supervisor), if you are a member of a church or synagogue many pastors priests and rabbis provide counseling to their members.

While friends and family can often be supportive, mental healthcare is not something most people are qualified to handle. Usually the first reaction of friends and family is to tell you to “cheer up” which is completely useless advice and what they are really telling you is really that they don’t want to hear about it. A professional counselor can provide several things: (1) A non-judgmental ear to listen, (2) Advice on techniques to effectively handle the feelings, and (3) Advice on techniques to reduce the frequency of the triggers for your depression.

Other things that can help:
(1) Journal your feelings and thoughts - I have always found that useful in helping me to sort out how I really feel and why. But be sure to keep it private away from others eyes unless they are qualified as your professional counselor.
(2) See if you can figure out your triggers that tend to lead to depression.
(3) Remember that depression, no matter how bad it gets is almost always temporary. Let that knowledge help you make it through the episodes. Do not make important decisions that you cannot readily undo while in an episode of depression.
(4) Do not become reliant on alcohol or drugs to make it through depression - It can set you up for a repeating cycle if you rely on alcohol or drugs to numb the pain which ultimately makes things much worse.

Reply
  Jon Tessler  |  6

actually depression is NOT temporary. depression is a chemical imbalance in the brain. it can be "controlled" with therapy, and medication, but it never will go away for good.

I know this because i have PTSD and MDD. if it wasn't for drugs and a good MH doctor, I would have either killed myself or someone else. I have dealt with this for 30 years.

By  Suaria  |  37

Honestly diet and exercise isn't always the answer. I know when I used to exercise and eat healthier than I do now were the years I was the most depressed in my life