By Anonymous - 13/05/2013 23:51 - United States - Quincy

Today, while doing a fun genetics game in Biology, I found out that I was adopted. Turns out the game wasn't so fun. FML
I agree, your life sucks 60 331
You deserved it 3 460

Add a comment

You must be logged in to be able to post comments!

Top comments

Ya know what you can say? Your parents picked you, other people just get what comes out :)

Honestly who cares? They love you, you love them, their your parents and your still their son, just not genetically

Comments

Comment moderated for rule-breaking.

Show it anyway

The only reason you should be upset is because they didn't tell you. Maybe they weren't ready? But anywho, like everyone's saying, you have loving parents, and that's all that matters! :)

Yea OP a lot of parents get stuck with whatever they spawn, your parents chose you :)

Some can't even "spawn" any :(

Just remember, those people you call you parents didn't just end up with you, they chose you over unknown amounts of other children. Feel special.

Exactly what I was thinking #1. I wasn't raised by my biological parents, I was raised by my great grandparents. They were in their 70's when they took on a 2 week old baby! I consider myself extremely lucky, because they chose me even though they didn't have to. Your parents are the people that raise you with love and support, not the people who create you.

Maybe it wil show teachers they probably shouldnt play that game anymore hahaha

What a load of shit. No, they said "we want a baby of this ethnicity" and ended up with OP and they probably only did that because they couldn't carry their own child. OP has every right to be upset. If his parents wanted him to be okay with being adopted they shouldn't have kept it a secret, as if its something to be ashamed of.

The point is that he/she is not either homeless or hungry, that she/he is educated, has someone that cares to and for her/his needs. Has stuff and opportunities lots of other orphans don't have and most importantly has a better start than many other people in life!

I agree that it's good OP has parents, but think about what must be going through his/her head. OP now has no idea who his or her birth parents are. You don't think that might be just a little upsetting?

Yes it's definitely upsetting #119. I didn't know my biological mother though until I was in about 17. And the thing is as soon as I met her I realized she may have given birth to me but she was not my mom. She was just a person. So eventually it stops being upsetting and all that's left is the feeling of how lucky one is to have the people in their lives that they have.

sucks to find out that way though

What type of biology game was it?

Sounds like the genetics square mapping. I had a friend who found out this way two. His parents' eye colors together couldn't have possibly made a child with his eye color.

OP could have had a genetic mutation, or perhaps OP's mom has been sleeping around.

I'm not sure how accurate those mapping things are. My mom has green eyes, my dad has blue, and I ended up with dark brown. *shrugs*

Actually eye color involves polymorphic genetics, that is, multiple genes are involved, not just one or two genes. Thus, you can't do the famous punnet squares to determine eye color.

44 - I've got a little "reference" guide for eye color genetics from a course I took a while ago, which says blue and green have a 0% chance of making a brown eyed baby. The guide was in a textbook with no source, so I'm not sure just how accurate it is, though

44, brown is a dominant gene. Your dad could have gotten two recessive genes, meaning blue eyes, but still carried the brown gene from your grandpa or a different relative.

But you can't have a recessive trait AND carry the dominant gene or else he would have brown eyes too.

SpamPam, I'm not exactly sure how it is with eyes, but I think it's sometimes a bit more complicated than that, such as with mixed dominants and whatnot.

my dad has blue eyes and I have brown and am definitely not adopted

if his parents were heterozygous that would mean he could be the 1 with blue eyes and still have the dominant brown gene in his dna

Dude, a carrier has to be hybrid

Actually everyone, if one parent had blue and the other has green, the kid(s) could end up with any of the others as long as their grandparents had that color or at least somewhere down the line. It's just a game of probability

Honestly who cares? They love you, you love them, their your parents and your still their son, just not genetically

Actually, their is correct. If you're going to be a grammar nazi, you need to know what you're talking about. Asshat.

You seriously don't know the difference between "they're" and "their", as well as "your" and "you're"? Sigh...

yeah reading that sentence made me cringe.

i guess it sucks they didn't tell you.

64- I do know the difference, but I was just trying to get a comment in quickly 73- you know there's something you can click that shows you disliked my message

"…just trying to get a comment in quickly…" If you truly do know the correct usage of words you wouldn't even have to think about which form to use. It would take no more time to use the correct form of words than it does to use the incorrect forms. Your excuse is invalid.

Ya know what you can say? Your parents picked you, other people just get what comes out :)

Well the only reason you have to be upset is that they didn't tell you. Other than that, be glad you have a family. There are many others out there who wished they had someone to take care of them, put a roof on their head, etc, but they don't.

Yes, I too want a roof to be put on my head

Comment moderated for rule-breaking.

Show it anyway

They don't have too.

If every FML had to be proved, no one would ever go through the effort of submitting a FML.

no, they don't -have- to, but some semblance of what possibly could've led them to that "realization" would be nice

think where you could've been now,ur lucky

If it was something about "my parents both have the recessive trait, but I have the dominant, boohoo", that's no proof for that you're adopted! My cousin has dark brown eyes while both of her parents have light blue - that's just how it sometimes turns out. She is a brown-eyed girl, daughter of two people with blue eyes, although the general rules say it shouldn't happen.

I think there's something your aunt and uncle aren't telling your cousin... Genetics don't lie.

Biology-10 doesn't seem to understand how it works. Parents who show a recessive trait can only pass on said trait. A pair of blue eyed people can only have blue eyed kids through normal means.

Nope - you just don't know genetics well enough - most things are decided by many different genes, not only one, like the "game" gives the impression of.

28: I study genetics, among other things ;)

Thank you katties! At least someone knows. -.- my parents have two very different eye colors and me and my brother ended up with different ones from both of them. Weird but true and we aren't adopted we're they're kids. I did a whole assignment on this shit like there's a certain possibility a kid will get a recessive gene it's just less likely they'll get it than a dominant one.

#29 I'm surprised so few people know that, we learned that in middle/high school (not sure what it is, different system here). We didn't have to know the details, it was just to explain whenever something seemed impossible (e.g. my parents are left handed but my sister is right handed, but that's determined by a lot of different genes).

You all seem to be very confused about genetics. Recessive and dominant genes involve a single gene. These genes do govern some traits in humans, for example, with colorblindness and X-linked diseases. In addition, dominant doesn't always "overpower" the recessive gene, there can be interactions between the dominant and recessive genes. For example, if a plant has a dominant gene to be red and a recessive to be white, the plant could be pink, it doesnt have to be red. The vast majority of genetics deals with polymorphisms, when many different genes are involved in determining a single trait. Eye color is an example of this. You simply can't look at the parents phenotype (physical manifestation) and try and determine the possibilities of the offspring.

Not sure who you call "all", but I believe most people can't know everything about genetics - they are so complicated that even people working with them might become confused. To anyone interested, here is another short explanation: X-linked traits appear dominant because there is no corresponding gene on the Y chromosome to interact with it, however there are a lot of different genes (or gene products, I would say) that CAN interact and decide the total outcome. Too complicated to explain it all here though. When it comes to gene dominance, there are degrees of dominance, so you can have completely dominant genes, or you can have genes that aren't, that give partly one trait and partly the other, or a mix of both, or that having several genes suddenly give a different outcome from any of them. Some traits are determined by an accumulation of genes. Genes are complicated, they interact with each other, they change and be turned on and off during our life (even eating different food can do this), they mutate, they can change places withing the DNA and a lot of them we have no clue about what are doing. Many of our genes are BTW put into our DNA by viruses. Don't feel stupid if you don't understand genes... just don't conclude on that you're adopted based on a biology game. Except when your blood type doesn't match the possible ones... then there might be something funky somewhere.

#20 You're right: genetics don't usually lie, but phenotypes (what we can see) do ;)

Wow! Thumbs up for the in-depth explanations. I actually learned some useful info on FML today!

Ok. For lesson #10 how do people end up with two different eye colors (one blue, one brown or green)???

Eye color, as I indicated above, is a polygenic trait, meaning many genes control it's expression (the eventual phenotype or physical manifestation). Heterochromia iridum is the medical term for an individual with 2 colored eyes. Eye color in the first place is due to the concentration of melanin in the iris, along with the way light is scattered by a medium found in the stroma of the iris, the fibrovascular upper layer of the iris. In heterochromia iridum, there generally is an excess of melanin (hyperpigmentation) or a severe lacking of this pigment in the iris (hypopigmentation). An individual may be born with this (congential heterochromia iridum), and thus, it is entirely genetic. However this also may be acquired later in life, as from injury, inflammation and even from using certain eye drops.