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  5HT2A  |  5

5- There's only one Azad that I know of and his last name is Baban, thought it might be you. Lol guess not sorry for the confusion!

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  pinkcrayola  |  0

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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62 - An element of Haitian Voudun is creating poppets (dolls) or fetishes (symbols) to invoke a purpose, good or bad. Surprise, the term "voodoo doll" came about for a reason. So yes, a part of it IS about that.

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  saksxalmo  |  20

#65, but that's like saying that some Catholics believe in exorcism, so all Christians must believe that any mental problem is the result of a spirit possession... Or that some Americans are fat, therefore all Americans must be fat... It's not actually true. Also, that kind of Haitian voodoo is NOT the norm. In fact, you could say that Haitian voodoo and Louisiana voodoo/Hoodoo are completely separate religions... I mean, some practitioners of Haitian voodoo also basically kidnap people and turn them into zombies, to the point where turning people into a zombie through voodoo is illegal (considered murder) in Haiti.

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  saksxalmo  |  20

#65- Oh, also (this is from Wikipedia, so you can interpret it however you like): "The practice of sticking pins in dolls has history in folk magic, but its exact origins are unclear. How it became known as a method of cursing an individual by some followers of what has come to be called New Orleans Voodoo, but more appropriately Hoodoo (folk magic), is unknown. This practice is not unique to Voodoo or Hoodoo, however, and has as much basis in magical devices such as the poppet and the nkisi or bocio of West and Central Africa. These are in fact power objects, what in Haiti is called pwen, rather than magical surrogates for an intended target of sorcery whether for boon or for bane. Such Voodoo dolls are not a feature of Haitian religion, although dolls intended for tourists may be found in the Iron Market in Port-au-Prince. The practice became closely associated with the Vodou religions in the public mind through the vehicle of horror movies and popular novels." So the whole voodoo doll thing doesn't sound very legitimate... do you have any sources to back up what you said? By the way, this is honest curiosity, I'm not trying to be mean. :) And I still found #8's comment funny, but #62 was technically right. :D

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