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Whoever said honesty is always the best policy.... Was lying.

Those policies suck, and they’re generally non-negotiable, no matter how discreet or how qualified the candidate is. It was something my old mentor constantly raged against at his old job.

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Whoever said honesty is always the best policy.... Was lying.

This is the number one (there’s at least a couple others) why you should NEVER put graffiti on something like a body part your going to have for the rest of your life. Especially in a prominent area. Live and learn I guess. Be an example to others.

Lol no. I have a tattoo, my immediate manager has a tattoo, a ton of my co-workers have many. While admittedly I do think face tattoos are going to close a lot of doors for you, anywhere else can easily be covered up if need be, and in general, ink on your skin (or holes in your ears) do not impact your ability to do a job.

Tattoos do not mark the person as bad, especially not anymore, and almost workplaces are accepting of them now. I’d be surprised if there’s a single teacher under 40 at my school who doesn’t have a tattoo.

Having tattoos is more common than not having them in a bunch of areas. It’s time for you to stop judging. Your views are outdated. My best friend is a surgeon who works in multiple hospitals and she has tattoos. Even the most “respectable” people have tattoos.

Those policies suck, and they’re generally non-negotiable, no matter how discreet or how qualified the candidate is. It was something my old mentor constantly raged against at his old job.

It’s bad enough being turned down for the job for this reason, but it’s better than being fired later if someone noticed you lied in the interview. Honesty is the best policy, just don’t volunteer negative information unless specifically asked. I am not a big fan of tattoos myself, but more and more people have them now. So it seems that it’s not a wise policy to restrict hiring to people with no visible tattoos unless there is some legitimate reason that I cannot think of.

@chazzter, in certain client-facing roles, especially in areas where the clientele tends to be older and/or very conservative, tattoos or extreme appearance could detract from customer perceptions. As an employee in such a role, you are the representative of the company visually and personally to their clients. As for other roles where you’re just behind a desk, it’s pretty asinine to let something like that keep you from an otherwise perfect employee.

I sometimes don't understand how tattoos can affect a person's work. I get the whole 'maintaining image' thing, but I honestly don't see how tattoos can be such a deal breaker.

If you really got the whole maintaining image thing you'd get why some companies don't want employees with tattoos. As micro managing as it seems there are some cultures, particularly Russian, Korean, and Japanese, where tattoos denote lawlessness. It may seem idiotic by our standards, but many companies don't want to risk offending people from those cultures

Honestly is such a lonely word.