By fml9124 - 14/11/2020 11:02

The long goodbye

  Today, my 79-year-old mom who has Alzheimer's fondly remembered all the wild sex she had with me back in the 1960s. I wasn't born then. She thinks I'm my dad, who died 15 years ago. In all of our conversations now, she talks to me as if she is talking to her husband and some of the talks turn racy. FML
Add a comment
You must be logged in to be able to post comments!
Create my account Sign in
Top comments
By  kimdaa  |  10

As embarrassing as those conversations are, you can take some positives from it: she remembers your father fondly and she still has her sense of humor.

By  RichardPencil  |  28

Get some noise-canceling headphones and blast some ASMR. A Brain Bleach series might help.

If you're not into tech, fill your ears with wax like Ulysses. The Odyssey is old school!

COMMENTS
By  kimdaa  |  10

As embarrassing as those conversations are, you can take some positives from it: she remembers your father fondly and she still has her sense of humor.

By  RichardPencil  |  28

Get some noise-canceling headphones and blast some ASMR. A Brain Bleach series might help.

If you're not into tech, fill your ears with wax like Ulysses. The Odyssey is old school!

By  coius  |  20

Remembering anything should be rejoiced. Also, you are an adult. Pretty sure you are aware your mother had sex. You should be grown up enough to know how you were produced. Here’s the thing, when your mother is gone, you will remember this and smile because she seemed lively in the middle of all this. Treat each day as if it was her last, and rejoice when she can remember things. Helping her remember things, no matter how bizarre helps keep the disease from cutting those connections. The more she remembers, the less decline she’ll have quickly. Stimulating the mind is the only way to slow the progress.

Reply
  Suaria  |  37

While this is somewhat true, it's generally the short term memories that go first and long term memories go last