By Anonymous - 29/12/2020 16:57

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Today, I saw a man begging for change downtown. I offered to buy him a meal, just to help him out with food. He said, "Sure, does Friday work?" I told him that I didn't mean it like that. Three hours later, he found me on Facebook. FML
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By  Chazzster  |  20

Block him.

It’s unfortunate, but many beggars and supposed “homeless people” are just using it as an opportunity for collecting money and consider it “their job”. Many others are addicted to drugs or alcohol and only want cash so they buy more drugs or alcohol. In either case they don’t want food - just cash.

I do not give to beggars or supposed homeless people for these reasons. Instead donate to the Salvation Army or other legitimate charities who actually do feed and house the homeless. But make sure it’s a legitimate charity that gets most of the donations to their mission and not to “fund raising costs” or “executive salaries” - Not all charities are legitimate. There are thieves and scammers everywhere...

By  Marcella1016  |  31

Idk there are many scammers and addicts out there but there’s also people who genuinely need help. For me, it’s not my place to judge and it will have absolutely no effect on me whatsoever what they do with the money, so I give a couple dollars when I can and I have it on me.

Interesting side story - there was this one kid in the downtown area of where I live like five years ago. He was maybe 17 and the most beautiful kid I had ever seen. Long dark brown hair and these amazing blue eyes. He could’ve been in a boy band. When he asked for the money, he had this cute (probably well-practiced) puppy-dog begging look in his eyes. I pulled out some money and peeled off a couple ones and handed them to him. He then asked for more and I told him that was it and his eyes hardened - he couldn’t keep the act up when he saw that I could’ve given him more money but I wasn’t going to. I could tell it was for drugs but I just shrugged it off and let it go. Fast forward a few years and I see this kid now and then, still begging for money. And good God. He has aged 15 or 20 years in just a few years, he is gaunt and his face looks terrible and there is just a dead look in his eyes. I feel bad and I don’t give him money anymore because I *know* it will be for drugs (I also feel a little guilty because maybe he does also need money for food, but he is clearly killing himself - and quickly).

I don’t really know the point of that story. I guess that I give people the benefit of the doubt and give what I can when I can. His is the only case where I stopped giving because I recognize him and know he is literally killing himself with drugs. It’s sad to watch. I hope he can get some help and turn his life around.

Back to OP - yeah that really sucks, as you were just trying to be helpful, and pretty creepy that he found you on Facebook. But I would say don’t let that stop you from helping other strangers. Keep that kindness, because it can really make a difference in other people’s lives.

COMMENTS
By  Chazzster  |  20

Block him.

It’s unfortunate, but many beggars and supposed “homeless people” are just using it as an opportunity for collecting money and consider it “their job”. Many others are addicted to drugs or alcohol and only want cash so they buy more drugs or alcohol. In either case they don’t want food - just cash.

I do not give to beggars or supposed homeless people for these reasons. Instead donate to the Salvation Army or other legitimate charities who actually do feed and house the homeless. But make sure it’s a legitimate charity that gets most of the donations to their mission and not to “fund raising costs” or “executive salaries” - Not all charities are legitimate. There are thieves and scammers everywhere...

Reply
  Marcella1016  |  31

Idk there are many scammers and addicts out there but there’s also people who genuinely need help. For me, it’s not my place to judge and it will have absolutely no effect on me whatsoever what they do with the money, so I give a couple dollars when I can and I have it on me.

Interesting side story - there was this one kid in the downtown area of where I live like five years ago. He was maybe 17 and the most beautiful kid I had ever seen. Long dark brown hair and these amazing blue eyes. He could’ve been in a boy band. When he asked for the money, he had this cute (probably well-practiced) puppy-dog begging look in his eyes. I pulled out some money and peeled off a couple ones and handed them to him. He then asked for more and I told him that was it and his eyes hardened - he couldn’t keep the act up when he saw that I could’ve given him more money but I wasn’t going to. I could tell it was for drugs but I just shrugged it off and let it go. Fast forward a few years and I see this kid now and then, still begging for money. And good God. He has aged 15 or 20 years in just a few years, he is gaunt and his face looks terrible and there is just a dead look in his eyes. I feel bad and I don’t give him money anymore because I *know* it will be for drugs (I also feel a little guilty because maybe he does also need money for food, but he is clearly killing himself - and quickly).

I don’t really know the point of that story. I guess that I give people the benefit of the doubt and give what I can when I can. His is the only case where I stopped giving because I recognize him and know he is literally killing himself with drugs. It’s sad to watch. I hope he can get some help and turn his life around.

Back to OP - yeah that really sucks, as you were just trying to be helpful, and pretty creepy that he found you on Facebook. But I would say don’t let that stop you from helping other strangers. Keep that kindness, because it can really make a difference in other people’s lives.

Reply
  samomaha  |  17

Research indicaters that as many as 95% of the people asking for money are actually scamming and using our guilt to make us pay them. That isn't charity, that's abusing the generosity of others. Different research projects show differing amounts ranging from 80% to 95%. The beggars on traffic islands at intersections wearing signs proclaiming homelessness, etc. are where these studies have been focused. We have two near my home whom I know are not homeless as they live in our neighborhood and have part-time jobs. It's just so lucrative . . . I saw a report on the news about a year ago that most "intersection beggars" bring home 6 digit incomes and (obviously) pay no taxes. I keep a few notecards in the glovebox of my car with the names and phone numbers of local assistance centers and hand those to the begging folks. Most get pissed off when they see what it is and throw it back at my car. If they don't truly need help, it serves the purpose well. If they do need help, it directs them where and how to get it. Save the money you would have given and donate to worthy and effective organizations who can take your dollars and make that money work harder and do more for those who need assistance. I see that as a plus any way you look at it.

Reply
  Bonnie Koster  |  5

So you are the expert on all things homelessness? You've been homeless before, to pass judgment on, generalize, and reign superiority over the other homeless people? Lmao weird flex but okay.