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taintedtruffle Say more :
He has plenty of cat toys and two siblings so I doubt he is bored. And no his name is Bananas because he's so crazy. I will encourage her to play with him more- he loves the wand toys . Thanks for the suggestions.
By Truffle - / Sunday 12 November 2017 17:22 / United States - Waldorf
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By  GhostFox  |  33

Sounds like lack of activity combined with separation anxiety- animals don't have many ways to channel the resulting energy, and unfortunately the ways they do have tend to be harmful to either them or their environment. Try dedicating a chunk of time in the morning and afternoon to play time. Twenty to thirty minutes each should cut down the craziness.

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By  GhostFox  |  33

Sounds like lack of activity combined with separation anxiety- animals don't have many ways to channel the resulting energy, and unfortunately the ways they do have tend to be harmful to either them or their environment. Try dedicating a chunk of time in the morning and afternoon to play time. Twenty to thirty minutes each should cut down the craziness.

By  taintedtruffle  |  37

He has plenty of cat toys and two siblings so I doubt he is bored. And no his name is Bananas because he's so crazy. I will encourage her to play with him more- he loves the wand toys . Thanks for the suggestions.

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  GhostFox  |  33

Ah, I didn't mean boredom, exactly. Cats- and dogs, too- can have too much physical energy, which causes them emotional stress and has been considered to actually cause pain in more extreme cases. So it might not be mental stimulation that he's lacking (and actually, having mental stimulation available for animals with high energy can actually make it worse since it can wind them up) as a physical outlet. If having the free time to actually play with him is a problem, there are also things like cat wheels (think of a hamster wheel, but much bigger and for cats) or even just one of those weird motor powered balls with a tail attached. If the behavior does keep happening (which, it sounds like it's a recurring problem even without stressors) you can try melatonin or Benadryl. I suggest at least discussing it with a vet, but if that isn't feasible, I suggest at least reading up on them. Melatonin's suggested starting dose is .75 mg, but I would suggest starting even lower, at .5 mg- and since melatonin is a supplement and this ingredients in the tablets can vary wildly, I really want to emphasize checking the ingredient lists to make sure there aren't any ingredients harmful to cats in it. With Benadryl, the dose given by vets is usually 1 mg/lb. So if you want to try that route, the best bet is the 12.5 mg tablets since you can break them in half for smaller cats, or give more for bigger cats. Both of those are methods suggested by vets- we use them with our rescue dog who has badly abused and has some major separation anxiety. I strongly suggest trying either having him wear a baby's onesie, or looking up how to use sport wrap bands to give to provide compression to see of it make him calmer. If either one does work, you may want to look into- or have your mom look into- getting him a ThunderShirt. It's a compressing jacket, similar to swaddling in how and why it works. Good luck with Banana! Hopefully my advice is new and helpful.

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