By Weekdae - 9/12/2020 09:01 - United States - Litchfield Park

Grammar police alert

Today, I found another comment online referencing, "Smoke weed everyday." With all due respect for smoking weed, when will people learn that "every" and "day" need to be two separate words in that context? This is seriously making it hard for me to focus on my work. FML
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By  Briarpatch  |  20

Yes, the phrase "every day" acts as a noun that means "with daily frequency" (e.g., "I wear clothes almost every day"), while "everyday" is an adjective that means "common or ordinary or routine" (e.g., "These shoes aren't fancy, so they're good for everyday wear"). I agree that they are two different things, and I have been known to complain about this very issue. However, in recent years, the one-word "everyday" used as a substitute for "every day" appears to be falling into common usage as a noun (see Sia's album, "Everyday Is Christmas"). The language changes according to usage. You don't have to like it, and you don't have to adopt it for yourself. But you also don't have to get pedantic with everyperson who has adopted the new usage. Getting shirty everytime people meld words that have no reason to be melded just makes you look petty. Pick your battles. Save your energy for more important issues.

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By  Briarpatch  |  20

Yes, the phrase "every day" acts as a noun that means "with daily frequency" (e.g., "I wear clothes almost every day"), while "everyday" is an adjective that means "common or ordinary or routine" (e.g., "These shoes aren't fancy, so they're good for everyday wear"). I agree that they are two different things, and I have been known to complain about this very issue. However, in recent years, the one-word "everyday" used as a substitute for "every day" appears to be falling into common usage as a noun (see Sia's album, "Everyday Is Christmas"). The language changes according to usage. You don't have to like it, and you don't have to adopt it for yourself. But you also don't have to get pedantic with everyperson who has adopted the new usage. Getting shirty everytime people meld words that have no reason to be melded just makes you look petty. Pick your battles. Save your energy for more important issues.

By  roosterchick  |  9

You're telling me someone's misuse of a word is causing you so much distraught at work you can't focus? I think the problem is you, not the people saying "everyday" instead of "every day". I see so many people using "your and "you're" wrong or the various forms of "there", but can still do my fucking job. Grow up.

By  BurnInDemonFire  |  30

Be careful with having that stick up your ass. Peritonitis is an embarrassing way to die.

Also, Briarpatch is right. If you're going to insist on calling out another person's spelling or grammar, make sure you're not the one who's mistaken. I really hope you don't work as a proofreader, or English teacher.

Y'all should install Grammarly, just to be sure you don't balls up again. And while you're at it, donate that high horse you fell from to an animal sanctuary. You won't ever need it again.