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By  cuz803  |  41

Give them a taste of their own medicine. When you see them enjoying something, ask them why they're enjoying it. See how it makes them feel cause nitpicking everything you like is a complete nuisance.

By  Chazzster  |  21

Having once been a teen and then much later having raised teenagers, I think I understand what is going on. The teenage years in most cases are when the child starts developing independence from the core family unit. That’s normal. But parents want to still get along with their children and understand what’s going on in their lives.

Sometimes the more teens pull away from the family the harder the parents try to keep the connection going. Just making conversation can sometimes become awkward. Keeping it a two way conversation involves asking questions if the other person isn’t volunteering any information or their thoughts. And if the parents are either critical or just want more details it can become painful and frustrating for everyone.

There is a way around this tension OP - Just speak up and tell your parents a bit about your day, your plans, and your thoughts. You don’t have to tell everything you think, but tell enough so your parents feel like they are still included in your life. Find some activities that you can enjoy with the family on a regular basis - maybe a family favorite TV show, whatever…

Remember this - the only person any of us can change is ourselves. Instead of demanding the other person or persons change, make some minor changes in your behavior to get along within the family. You should find that these minor changes will be reciprocated by your parents by letting them be a bit less intrusive if you are volunteering a bit more information.

COMMENTS
By  Thaylok  |  6

They are working to help you develop your reasoning skills. That helps you understand why you do the things you do. Those reasoning skills, in turn, help develop your critical thinking ability.

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Yeah, I don’t think that’s what’s going on here. Unless both parents are either psychologists or teachers. I don’t think parents think about building critical thinking skills.

By  cuz803  |  41

Give them a taste of their own medicine. When you see them enjoying something, ask them why they're enjoying it. See how it makes them feel cause nitpicking everything you like is a complete nuisance.

By  Chazzster  |  21

Having once been a teen and then much later having raised teenagers, I think I understand what is going on. The teenage years in most cases are when the child starts developing independence from the core family unit. That’s normal. But parents want to still get along with their children and understand what’s going on in their lives.

Sometimes the more teens pull away from the family the harder the parents try to keep the connection going. Just making conversation can sometimes become awkward. Keeping it a two way conversation involves asking questions if the other person isn’t volunteering any information or their thoughts. And if the parents are either critical or just want more details it can become painful and frustrating for everyone.

There is a way around this tension OP - Just speak up and tell your parents a bit about your day, your plans, and your thoughts. You don’t have to tell everything you think, but tell enough so your parents feel like they are still included in your life. Find some activities that you can enjoy with the family on a regular basis - maybe a family favorite TV show, whatever…

Remember this - the only person any of us can change is ourselves. Instead of demanding the other person or persons change, make some minor changes in your behavior to get along within the family. You should find that these minor changes will be reciprocated by your parents by letting them be a bit less intrusive if you are volunteering a bit more information.