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By Anonymous - / Monday 12 October 2015 02:02 / United States
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The tech can't legally tell you. But in all honesty he could be wrong. In the hospital I have had techs say someone had cancer/stroke/ etc. which they didn't. Or that someone is completely normal and fine, but were full of cancer.

You'll get to know soon OP. You'd rather hear it from a professional anyways. The tech could just see something normal that he thinks is off.

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that is a horrible thing to say. I am fairly certain that if it was you in this situation you wouldn't feel relieved thinking it's just cancer. Even if this was just meant as a "joke" it was in poor taste.

You'll get to know soon OP. You'd rather hear it from a professional anyways. The tech could just see something normal that he thinks is off.

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There's nothing certain about what 2 said, 31. For all we know the tech could have seen a full-sized SUV inside OP. But I'm sure everyone would rather hear news from their doctor than some random behind-the-scenes worker, and I doubt a week or so would kill OP.

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31- After a while, techs may develop the ability to tell when something may be wrong, but they don't have the medical education and training necessary to diagnose patients. Which is exactly why it would have been illegal for the tech to tell OP what he thinks is wrong. Just like as a nurse, I often have an idea of what is wrong with a patient, but it would be illegal for me to diagnose them because I don't have the necessary education and training. There is a reason why doctors have to go throug

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49 thank you for your response, I completely agree with you and appreciate you saying it. As you have correctly stated, over the years techs learn certain things based on what they have seen over and over, a circle in the lung is a circle in the lung the next time. But, as we who are in medicine know, medicine is a field of variability, with no two cases or patients the same - that circle could be a cancer, it could be a benign hamartoma, could be a consolidated focal pneumonia, etc. For one thi

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55- No problem. It's kind of a pet peeve of mine. I have actually reported techs and fellow nurses because they were giving a diagnosis or prognosis.

The tech can't legally tell you. But in all honesty he could be wrong. In the hospital I have had techs say someone had cancer/stroke/ etc. which they didn't. Or that someone is completely normal and fine, but were full of cancer.

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Tech: hey it was nothing to worry about! Scan came in clean! Doctor: ahh shiiiit, actually you full with cancer...

There's a reason techs aren't allowed to tell you what they see. They aren't specifically trained to know how to view the results. Try not to worry too much just yet. :)

Maybe it was just a problem with the tech and not you...I'm a medical physicist and I can assure you we're not qualified to diagnose patients. We mostly operate the imaging devices and most of them can't tell a spot apart from a tumor.

That is not ethical at all. I know they can't say anything but he should've kept calm till he was alone... hope u get your results back quickly OP

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18- You can't really claim you are alone while actively scanning a patient. You may be separated depending on the type of the scan, but that doesn't mean you're alone. Alone means the patient is gone and out of sight and hearing range. The tech's conduct was absolutely unprofessional and he should be reprimanded so he hopefully learns that he needs to maintain his composure around patients, whether he thinks they can see him or not.

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