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By T_Willl / Wednesday 17 November 2010 03:43 /
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You should never be rude no matter how the customer is acting. On the other hand I have a feeling he was lying to you just to get at you. An owner will not act like that in front of his employees. He would loose everyones respect and the business would turn chaotic.

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  ulicksam  |  0

Maybe he really didn't "act like that". I have a feeling the owner wasn't that rude to begin with. Like you said, the owner wouldn't act like that in front of his employees.

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  meowcow  |  3

tell him to fuck off because he was rude to you first. Corporate managers have no feelings so he will promote you for being a hardass cuz he'll think you run his store like a sweatshop to earn more money. if u say sorry, he'll be the alpha male

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  marinus_fml  |  19

Have you even looked in the dictionary? Tho is a word, and it's in the dictionary, and it's perfectly fine to be used in the context I just did. As far as insulting me with 'idiot' goes, please be more original ok? Now go look it up in the dictionary, Idiot!

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  cpatrick820  |  3

tho [thoh] –conjunction, adverb an informal, simplified spelling of "though". It's informal, meaning it's in the same inbred family as "irregardless" and "thru". Just because it's in the dictionary doesn't make it a word.

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  cpatrick820  |  3

Both "thru" and "tho" are listed in the dictionary as informal. Informal means it is a "word" that has caught on by frequent incorrect use (typically through text messages and online comments). If everyone is jumping off the bridge, and it is noted as happening, does it make it right?

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  ca123  |  0

Your comparison between suicide by jumping off of a bridge and the use of "tho" over " though" is lazy hyperbole and invalid. It's common knowledge that though a word is not formally listed in the dictionary, a common acceptance of an agreed upon usage, makes said word valid in the appropriate context. In fact, the dictionary grows every year with new words that were but a few years ago considered jibber. This is an appropriate context for "tho". What.

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  marinus_fml  |  19

Does that deem 'hey' as not a word. Hey has become an informal way of saying hello... just because it's informal, does not mean it's not a word. I was not arguing whether thru was formal or not, rather, defending my use of the word 'tho', as someone tried telling me it's not a word. On the other hand, if I had used the word 'sup, and someone told me it's not a word, I would have to agree as it's not in the dictionary. Even tho it's a commonly used word.

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  cpatrick820  |  3

The bridge analogy is an age-old one. It's not lazy, just classic. If you've never heard it before, that's an issue of your own. And by your logic, "ur", "thnx", "w/e", etc. are all legitimate words due to their frequent use. If you truly believe words like this are acceptable for use outside of texting, you are by far the lazy one. The only real words that are being added are ones that describe things indescribable by past words, such as "texting" and "gigabyte".

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  marinus_fml  |  19

Nope, read again! I said once words like 'ur' 'thnx' 'txt' etc enters the dictionary, I'll start using them. Since they are not in the dictionary, I will refuse to use them.

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  elmorous  |  0

Grammar nazis, have fun with this: OP, you shouldn't've been rude to your customer! Rudeness and anger are signs of weakness. As a manager, you should know this, and failed right in front of the owner.

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  sourgirl101  |  21

At one point, the word "ain't" wasn't considered a word because people argued that it wasn't in the dictionary. It's in there now, but did that stop it from being a word then?

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  5t3ff1k4h  |  43

Irregardless? I can see where you're going with 'tho' and 'thru', but irregardless... I haven't looked in the dictionary as of yet, but that doesn't sound right. I've been corrected in regards to that word before, so I stopped using it because according to other users on this site, 'irregardless' is not a word. Regardless is the word you're looking for.

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  elmorous  |  0

Irregardless is a word! It is an adjective that is a compound word, blended from 'irrespective' and 'regardless'. Unfortunately, people tend to use it when 'regardless' should have been used alone, which then becomes bad grammar.

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  elmorous  |  0

Before someone destroys me, the prefix 'ir-' and the suffix '-less' are both negative, making them redundant in the same word. Since both words are a negative form of the word 'regard', the correct one to use, in proper english, is always 'regardless'.

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  knight0748  |  5

informal or not, these are words being used in our society. believe it out not, the dictionary evolves as the society's usage of words changes, not the other way around. and if enough people make use of a informal word, it's a word. also btw, not all the dictionaries are the same, they include or exclude words depending on the editing.

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  TwoZeroOZ  |  2

marinus, sorry but you're wrong. The others are correct on all accounts. "Hi" is a real word, in the dictionary. "Sup" is not, because it is slang. Can slang or other informal words be in the dictionary? Of course. Does that suddenly make them real words that are grammatically correct to use? Nope - in fact, it even tells you that "tho" is an informal word. By your logic, if any shortened version of a word was listed in the dictionary, then it suddenly becomes the actual word itself, instead of just a shortened spelling. Doesn't make much sense, does it?

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You guys are losers. I agree that grammar is necessary, but it's not such a big deal that you need to leave 38 comments about it. You're not actually making yourselves look intelligent, just douche-baggish. But seriously, have you nothing better to do than argue about grammar online? It's not that hard to just let it go... *facepalm* See ya.

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