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Technically Correct: The Best Kind of Correct

By Sufia - / Saturday 28 October 2017 19:51 /
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By  davecross  |  11

While I disagree with any teacher calling there student name. Im going to assume that your teacher didn't know that People in Asia refer to their self as Asian. Like myself I guessing when he here's someone is Asian he thinks Chinese,Japanese, Vietnamese, and Korean ( not sure if I'm missing any others).

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  PenguinPal3017  |  8

Wait wait wait, hold the fuck up. "Asian" is used to refer to people from Asia? Mind fucking blown.

By  Suaria  |  30

Most people in the USA only think Asia encompasses East Asia (China, Japan, Korea, etc) and forget or aren't educated that South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, etc) is still Asia as well.

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  PenguinPal3017  |  8

I always ask people just where those places are then. "Are you saying Pakistan is in Africa?"

By  krgoks  |  7

Comment moderated or buried due to negative votes. Show the comment

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  krgoks  |  7

Be sure to to point out what is stupid, disgusting, and embarrassing so I can make you look stupid, be disgusted, and feel embarrassed. Read and understand the comment before you troll. Nothing I said is of the sorts. It was long to point out all the comparisons. And to repeat: the OP is right to refer to him/herself as Pakistani, Asian, Eastern Pangaean, Earthling - whatever - and be correct. Whatever you identify as is good.

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  GhostFox  |  33

The teacher was saying that Pakistan wasn't considered an Asian country. Which it is. People also DO identify by continent under certain circumstances, such as when there is a major event elsewhere on the continent. It also is fairly common for someone to say that they are a(n) "*country* *continent*" such as saying they are "Pakistani Asian." There also the fact that you are defending a teacher verbally abusing a student, based off your misunderstanding of the teacher's own lack of understanding. Defending someone who is obviously riding a power trip, no matter how much you try to blur that you are, is pretty gross. Not to mention that identities don't in fact work in a "if you say you are, you are" way for all types of identities. Particularly when it comes to cultures that you have no real connection to or knowledge of, as that is called appropriation and is pretty highly frowned.

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  Chinaski76  |  15

Here’s what’s wrong with your comment (and this is going to be long): by definition, “Asian” is someone or something from the continent of Asia. This is not limited to “Oriental” countries (also, Oriental is widely and historically considered to be a fairly racist and derogatory term). Pakistan is on the Asian continent, therefore, OP is Asian. Pakistan is also part of what’s geographically termed “the Middle East”, so OP could also be considered Middle Eastern (geography is not an either/or subject. Places can be part of two regions). Next, you seem to be saying that the only people who call themselves Asian are adopted and don’t know their country of origin. I live in China and have traveled extensively around many parts of Asia. I know many Asians who would be thoroughly confused by your claim. People outside of Asia can say they have “Asian” heritage or roots and know precisely what those roots are, they just choose to use the term Asian either as a general term or to indicate roots in multiple Asian countries. Then, when you refer to Europeans, you say “we” and “they”. To whom are those pronouns referring? Because if by “we” you mean people of European background or heritage, I would like to be excluded from that (also, I fear, that “we” may refer to Americans—please exclude this American from that as well). Finally, you talk about African people not knowing their roots or country of origin. Do you mean African Americans? Because, yes, many African Americans whose ancestors were slaves do not know countries or regions of their family origins. But you do have to see that the statement about Africans referring to themselves as African because they don’t know their country of origin is absurd, right? I’m fairly certain many Africans know what country they live in.

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  krgoks  |  7

[This is a reply to several commentors, so if an item doesn't apply to you, to you it probably wasn't meant to apply]. You are honing in on keywords and attacking before understanding. You read "Oriental" and cry even though in this context it is acceptable and you aren't even Asian. (Some Far Easterners do take offense when labeled this, but labeling countries Oriental is fine). Second, I'm not defending the teacher, I wasn't there to know exactly what happened. We all take these teeny-tiny FMLs and extrapolate a scenario full assumptions. I specifically stated that the teacher was wrong in his/her approach and could very well be the monster you're conjuring. I'm not as quick to pass judgment, and in the extreme case he/she is a reasonable human-being, I offer a rationale. Third, please don't attach labels to me without knowing me. It takes quite the hypocrit to label me, claim "that's not how [labels] works," and defend the OP in the same breath. when I travel, most strangers that get to know me think I'm Canadian or even South African. "You are what you say you are" means a lot to me with my background and everyone has this right. One's country of origin, parents, skin color, gender, or clothes don't define a person. If the OP wants to self-identify as Asian then that is fine and dandy; however, that may be a little too vague for people. I have a close Pakistani friend, and out of all of her foreign friends I've meet at numerous cultural fairs we've attended, I have yet to hear one say "I am Asian" or "I am from Asia." THAT DOESN'T MEAN THEY AREN'T ASIAN, but the answers they gave are the ones that people are seeking. Fourth, I know my original comment wasn't worded perfectly - I assumed one could read it in context and understand. Most of the content refers to people visiting/living in non-native countries. Nobody goes around asking locals where they are from, silly goose. Fifth, FIND A MORE APPROPRIATE WORD OTHER THAN "RETARD". That concludes volume III.

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  almost_there44  |  23

This is for you krygoks. No matter how long you write your next science fiction book, if you continue with this thesis and end your conclusion as such, you will still be wrong. Having a stong vocab and writing hundreds of pages does not mean that your point is right.

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How could OP be wrong? There’s only 3 major types of skull shape: caucasoid (European), negroid (African), and mongoloid (Asian). Each type is associated with a region, and are the determiners for the multitude of races within each region. OP is Asian.

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  Chinaski76  |  15

Good lord, you *hoMe* in on a target or an idea. You *hoNe* a knife or a skill to make it sharper. Your basic point (there are different levels of identity which we can use to identify ourselves) is valid, but nearly everything else you say is misguided and barely comprehensible, so it does make it difficult for people to agree with you. You cannot take issue with other people not getting context or meaning from your writing when you did not bother to provide it. I’ll make this as clear as I can: There is no possible scenario where the teacher is correct. As for the rest of your comment, look carefully at what you wrote. There is a wide gap between what you were trying to say and what you actually said. This is why people took issue with your comment (and subsequent comments). Using precise, clear language and terminology helps people understand what you’re saying. Also, Oriental, historically, has meant areas east of Europe and included Turkey, parts of Africa, the sub-Continent, as well as East and South Eastern Asia. Until well into the late 20th century, it was also used as a pejorative for a person from *any* of those countries (including Turkish, Egyptian, Indian, and yes, Pakistani people). It is rarely used now not only because of its racist connotations, but because it is a vague and imprecise term. People who want to be understood will typical say “East Asia” or “Middle East”.

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