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By butterfingers / Friday 6 December 2013 07:08 / United States - New Wilmington
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By  Dilwann  |  27

Why would anyone need to buy a $400 bottle of wine? Being a cheap ass myself I found a delicious tasting one for about $4. And sure, I get paying as much as $80 for wine... but 400? That's just a waste of money. Remember, a higher price doesn't always means better taste.

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  Superstitious  |  6

That stuff doesn't grow on trees

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  evan_7899  |  28

Actually, it does. Wine is made from grapes. Grapes grow on trees. Mystery Solved.

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  whatafuckup  |  14

Sue the company

By  Aksta  |  18

You really corked that up

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  CallMeMcFeelii  |  13

I miss Doug.. That show was the shit. And Hey Arnold. And Rocko's Modern Life. And.. The Angry Beavers! Man, do I miss The Angry Beavers.. That was my all time favorite show as a youngin. They don't make cartoons like they used to.

By  Dilwann  |  27

Why would anyone need to buy a $400 bottle of wine? Being a cheap ass myself I found a delicious tasting one for about $4. And sure, I get paying as much as $80 for wine... but 400? That's just a waste of money. Remember, a higher price doesn't always means better taste.

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  doodlecloud  |  26

I thought this kinda thing...but then I thought what if it was at work, for rich clients or something? Unlikely as it's not mentioned but that'd be a double FML.

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  DocBastard  |  38

Dilwann, perhaps your cheap palate can't differentiate between a cheap wine and an excellent one, but I guarantee that a wine connoisseur, someone willing to pay $400 for a bottle, can. I also don't think it's your position to say what is or isn't a waste of money.

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  boating_guy  |  33

Everybody has their vice of choice they're willing to splurge on. For some, it's wine. Just because it's a "$400 bottle of alcohol" doesn't mean it needs to be frowned upon. Also, when it comes wine and expensive drinks, people care about more than just the alcohol in a beverage, such as craftsmanship and prestige of the drink. I happen to have had a few tastes of bottles of wine worth several hundred dollars in my time, and I can certainly say they are astoundingly delicious. Worth the money? That's up to the individual. Only he absurdly rich would spend money on alcohol like that for the purpose of having an alcohol to consume.

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  oj101  |  33

As with everything these days, the price is based on 5% substance and 95% marketing.

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  Dilwann  |  27

DocBastard, you're right in saying that it's not my place to tell others what can be considered a waste of money. I seem to remember though that there is not a significant difference between experts and laymen when it comes to wine tastings (or beer, not certain). I've tried looking up some articles to back up that hypothesis, but didn't find anything with the right topic. boating_guy, not everyone is willing to splurge on anything (taking myself as subjective example). It is also not because it's alcohol that I frown upon this example, just the immense amount of money paid for it. This also implies that I don't care about the alcohol in a beverage, but certainly do acknowledge one drinks for the taste. This is also why I mentioned the very cheap wine that tasted delicious. I'm also not denying that expensive wine can be delicious. I'm just saying that one could get one with a great taste for far less money as well, in which case spending a lot of money seems like a waste. I can't argue with the 'for the prestige' part though. A lot of people want to seem successful, even though they're not necessarily. I personally find prestige to be of lesser value than the practical use of objects, but that's just my opinion.

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  glabberfasted  |  16

I'm sure you have SOMETHING you splurge or spend lots of money on, though. I think everyone does, and it's their business, and their business alone, what they choose to do so on. Personally, I think it's completely ridiculous that people spend $200+ on video games, but I wouldn't dare tell them that, because it's their money. I would rather put my money into my cars.

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  Dilwann  |  27

Well, I told you, I'm a cheap ass. The only thing I spend a lot of money on is plane tickets to go see my long-distance boyfriend... but again, that's a practical use. I still buy my tickets as cheap as possible. I would challenge you to make me see my 'object of splurging' but I think that would take some time.

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  Ambient25  |  24

OK look. Splurging is a matter of preference and perspective. Some people have the money to buy $250 entrees at a restaurant let's say, other's barely have enough for Chilis. It doesn't make either the better or the worse. I know a guy who has the money for a Ferrari yet still drives a Toyota Camry. It's just based on people's tastes. If you've noticed, everyone is guilty of splurging. I guarantee you spend more per day now than you did 5 years ago. It just goes with the territory. If you get a great job that pays double let's say, you wouldn't be against spending 50% more on yourself each day. I don't really see what the argument is here though. It's like telling people what position is best in sex. It's just based on preference and what they like...

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  Dilwann  |  27

I would say there's a strong semantic difference between 'spending more' and 'splurging', but then again, I'm not a native English speaker. I interpret 'splurging' as spending an amount of money on something that other people generally would see as extreme. And I don't consider this conversation as an argument in the bad sense of the word, more like a debate.

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  Ambient25  |  24

Everything can be considered extreme. There are people who would question the purchase of a coffee per day as extreme, not in the sense of drinking it but that it's $40 too much over the course of a paycheck. I dunno, I see splurging as spending lots of money. You can splurge on what you enjoy, but for the most part it requires extra money.

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  Dilwann  |  27

That's why I mentioned it being seen as extreme 'generally speaking'. I doubt most people would think a coffee a day is extreme. I'm thinking more in the direction of the stereotype of women that go shopping once every (few) day(s) and own 50 handbags and 80 pairs of shoes. But I do see your point.

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  Dthsapprntc  |  23

I always thought splurging meant to spend money on something you want thay you normally wouldn't spend money on. For example, I hardly ever drink soda, so when I on occation buy a $1.50 bottle of coke I think of that as splurging. Or if I decide to go out to eat instead of cooking at home, even if it is somewhere cheap, I think of that as splurging. That's my two cents, feel free to ignore.

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  oj101  |  33

#4 - I guess it's all relative as people value different things differently. 10 years ago, I lived in a pretty poor part of the UK where I remember that I couldn't even get a £2 magazine if I asked for one --- then my parents struck it rich and we are pretty wealthy nowadays in Australia. For me, I have no problem with spending $150 on a steak, $350 hoodies (GANT/Crew) or $2,500 on a MacBook Pro etc but I would never dream of spending more than $10 on a t-shirt, $2 for pens or even 30 cents for a carrier bag at the supermarket.

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  falon142012  |  22

Ambient, that's what I call the "human mentality." I don't know if it has an actual name, but I talk to my husband about it all the time. When you make more money, you want to spend more money. And I hate that about humans, myself included. For example, you live in a decent apartment and drive a decent car. You get a pay increase, let's say double what you were making, and now you want a NICE apartment and a NICE car. That's all fine and dandy, but the next pay increase or better job and you want even more. When in all reality, the way I see it, if you would stick to the decent apartment and decent car for maybe a period of ten more years, you would save your extra money and then maybe you'd have enough to buy a house! But people just don't work like that. A rare few do. My in-laws, as an example of the human mentality, started off pretty broke. And every time they got better jobs or pay raises, they'd move into something better, get a better car, or two, and be content for a while. Now they own their own house, but it's isn't that nice of a house, and like 10 super nice cars. They EACH make 6 figures a year, and they do have the right to spend it how they want. And I'm not bashing them, just using them as an example to say, maybe if they had put off the expensive cars for a few years, and going out so much, they'd be able to build their own super nice house by now. But they take cruises every year and constantly blow money on nights out, yet then complain that there's no money for groceries. It's important to always keep a sense of your priorities as you move up in life. If I had that much money, I'd damn sure be saving for the nicest house I've ever seen, so that my kids can always have something to come home to. And if that meant driving my decent car for a few more years, so be it. Human mentality can be terrible.

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  Ambient25  |  24

Totally agree with you. It's sad too. My friend gets asked all the time why he doesn't turn his car up a notch. How he has wealth yet "shows" he doesn't. It's really none of their business. But then the question pops up. Is that 'human mentality" more to our nature, or to the acceptance to society? The "norm" that more wealth means higher spending.

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  FrankHotpants  |  30

If you have the money to do so then it may not sound so silly. That's like wondering why people don't all drive the same car, they all get you where you need to go right?

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  doodlecloud  |  26

DocBastard and Dilwann - As you couldn't find one, here's an article that collates different studies, all that found that there was very little, or no, actual difference between expensive and cheap wine. I don't really like wine myself so I'm afraid I can't contribute my own opinion but I thought it was interesting.

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  alaarch  |  7

There was a study conducted on wine connoisseurs where they gave them wine and told them it was expensive, to which the critics described it positively, and then gave them wine and told them it was cheap, to which the critics described it (incredibly) negatively. In reality, it was the same bottle of (cheapish) wine. I'd never be able to spend that much on wine, but whatever floats your boat I guess. OP Just remember, you're paying for the name/age/etc of the wine, not the taste necessarily. This applies to most things that are extremely expensive.

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  gc327072  |  29

Need? Humans only NEED clothes, a warm straw hut, a bit of attention, and a few scoops of porridge. I don't get people like you: Why do you NEED a $200 leather coat? Why do you NEED a $400 bottle of wine? Why do you NEED a car that goes 0-60 in X seconds? Why do you NEED that video game? These aren't things that anyone NEEDS, these are things people WANT. If someone wants to buy an item with the money they earned, who are you to question their taste? God forbid someone have different things they like to spend their money on.

By  mythicaltimes  |  15

Did you have some bottled up anger?

By  Ambient25  |  24

If you were trying to impress your girlfriend's dad OP with an "amazing" wine then I can nod my head in understanding. But for dropping it...you better lick that shit!

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