120
Add a comment
You must be logged in to be able to post comments!
Create my account Sign in
Top comments
By  TristSlater  |  6

Musicians treasure antique instruments. Ever thought of that? Guess not. Musicians prefer older instruments to newer ones. The older it is, the better it sounds because the instrument was broken in. Second reason, better quality. There are sets of violins from the 18th century that sound and play better than those made today.

Comments
By  tekcor  |  13

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

Reply
  White667  |  13

This is the second FML recently where a child has used permanent marker on something; what is wrong with parents America? seriously, why would ANYONE give a child a permanent marker. EVER. That's just trouble waiting to happen.

Reply
  vetter_fml  |  13

It's not like parents hand children permanent markers and say, "Scribble Away, young Picasso! Destroy our home while creating your childhood memories." Children find things/get into things and use them thoughtlessly.

Reply
  fawfulster  |  13

Is it really something to rant on? I really hate these FMLs where they go "Today my little sibling *something something* and he wrote/drew *something* in Sharpie. FML" Just use alcohol goddamnit!

Reply
  tisiphone_fml  |  6

This exact same thing happened to my music school's. It is a varnished upright piano, and we simply chose to strip and revarnish it completely. It ruins the antique value, but I sadly don't know of many things that will remove permanent marker from wood without damaging the finish.

Reply
  phantomdonut  |  6

I agree - OP, you should do some research and find the name of a shop that specializes in stripping and refinishing antiques, preferably antique musical instruments. The internet is a beautiful thing - you shouldn't have too much trouble finding someone that can do the job. Perhaps a local music shop will be able to direct you to someone reputable. Unfortunately, this will cost you a pretty penny. Tell your family to take it out of your brother's college fund! *Kidding* If money is an issue (I'm assuming you're in your teens if you have a brother that young, and probably as broke as I was as a teen) you may be able to work out a payment plan with the shop. If this isn't an option, you can look online (or in the library) for information on how to refinish it yourself. WARNING - I've refinished furniture. It's messy, the chemicals stink, it takes a lot of time and a lot of room. (I took over my Dad's entire garage for nearly a month refinishing a vanity in my free time after school and between work.) I've never refinished a finely tuned musical instrument, though. You should DEFINITELY check with a local music shop to see what they think about this option. Whatever you choose to do, I hope everything works out for you.

By  cozcat  |  6

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

Reply
  TristSlater  |  6

Musicians treasure antique instruments. Ever thought of that? Guess not. Musicians prefer older instruments to newer ones. The older it is, the better it sounds because the instrument was broken in. Second reason, better quality. There are sets of violins from the 18th century that sound and play better than those made today.

By  infiniti_G  |  5

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

Reply

Well I don't know about his grandma, but we bought a grandma for about that much and made some beautiful leather handbags out of her. It was a bit messy but definitely worth what we paid. Reminds me of my own grandma every time I open it and catch a whiff of it. Now you can't put a price that.

Reply
  SummerFever  |  5

It will also dissolve paint and finishes. I made that mistake. It took the finish off of a spot on the wooden liner and you can see the bare drywall in another spot on the wall.

Loading data…