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The illustrated FMLs

Today, I finally decided to get my five-year-old son a rabbit, so I explained to him how to take care of it. When I'd finished listing all the things he'd have to do, he replied, "That's too complicated... Couldn't we just eat it instead?" FML

By Anonyme / Friday 16 May 2014 07:55 / Canada - Saint-jean-de-matha
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By  Welshite  |  39

At least you know he'll do well in survival situations. Next thing you know, he'll be testing out recipes with the neighbor's hamster, and the snake he found in the backyard.

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  AmexBlack  |  23

Growing up in Ireland, my Grandma ate rabbit stew all the time. My dad and uncles would go into the fields and put a ferret into the rabbit warren and when the rabbits ran out, shoot them. It was free food and very tasty, and it helps the environment as rabbits are quite destructive. Eating a pet rabbit though is a bit of a queer one..

By  Welshite  |  39

At least you know he'll do well in survival situations. Next thing you know, he'll be testing out recipes with the neighbor's hamster, and the snake he found in the backyard.

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  mario2012  |  18

You tried, but not very well.

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  RadikulRam  |  16

Absolutely, I had a rabbit when I was around the same age, and it was so aggressive. In hindsight I was just picking up the little bugger and annoying the poor thing, but I was too young to know.

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  iAlissa  |  34

I don't know about "bad pet". My bunny is litter trained, comes when called, does tricks, and even goes on walks with me. She's an awesome pet. My other bunny is blind and fat but I still think they're awesome animals :)

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  DraconicFeline  |  31

41 - How on earth did you manage that? I'm honestly not trying to be obnoxious; I love bunnies, but I didn't think they had the mental capacity to be taught to respond to commands, let alone taking a walk at your side.

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  MegamiKaosu  |  28

I have two pet bunnies and work in a pet store where I have talked several people out of buying bunny /rabbits for their little kids. My oldest rabbit comes when I call him, snuggles with me and watches tv on the couch. The youngest (the baby) is learning her name and comes half the time when called, it's not hard. It's like training a dog, you just keep at it with treats or pet rewards.

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I agree 100%. I have two rabbits, and I do not think they're suitable for children. Most don't like to be held, and kids often lose interest. Mine are litter trained, but it's still a mess to clean! Cat litter is much easier to clean. Also, adopt, don't shop! There are TONS of rabbits in need of homes in shelters. :)

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  brenton490  |  19

I had a very evil bunny some spawn of Dracula once... It would charge at you and try to bite anyone that touched its cage. Lets just say it didn't last very long...

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  Dashelle  |  25

Exactly what I was thinking. I've seen so many parents buy rabbits for kids, just to dump them at a shelter when the kid injures them and the parents don't want to pay. I cringe when someone says "I bought a pet for my kid!"

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  Dashelle  |  25

#58, they aren't quite as intelligent as cats or dogs, but they have a very high mental capacity. "Rabbits=dumb" is a myth I often have to debunk. I had one figure out the lock on her pen! Mine are also litter trained, come when called, and know how to ask for attention.

By  Jayy_Dash23  |  9

woah... W. T. F.??

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  rocker_chick23  |  27

I caught my son doing that once and I told him if he did it again that he wouldn't help me with his betta for a month. He likes helping me with the animals and promised he wouldn't do it again.

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