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Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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It doesn't work in the US apparently :) And a small correction, OP CAN be sued, but he/she has a 99.999999999% chance of winning and not being charged if he/she acted within the level of training...

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#51 The Good Samaritan Law works only in the event that you don't have a "duty to act". As a lifeguard, if you are on duty, you have a duty to act and can be sued for criminal negligence if you do not do what you have to do, or if you do it incorrectly. You also CANNOT help a person who doesn't give you their consent (assuming they're in a position to do so I.e. Not unconscious or mentally incapacitated, or a child) Also, to 49, if the person said "you should have let me die" at the hospital, it's more than likely they were unconscious, in which case, consent is implied.

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Although it's a possibility, it doesn't matter unless someone else there knows about the DNR and can provide a physical copy on the spot. Also, it has to be signed by a doctor, can't be expired, oh! And if that person has given someone else power of attorney, that can trump their DNR, even if it is valid. *sigh* DNRs are a nightmare for emergency responders, because of the legal implications surrounding it.

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I'm a bit unsure as to why some people are DNR.. If I could have saved them but they had a DNR it wouldn't feel right to just ignore them. And if I found out they died and it could have been prevented, I wouldn't be able to not feel at least a bit guilty.

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#66, DNRs are for people who have been diagnosed with something terminal and have less than a year left. Those that choose to have one typically do it because they don't want their suffering prolonged unnecessarily.

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