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Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  redbluegreen  |  45

#1- Depending on the severity of the daughter's intolerance, her changing her diet alone may not be enough. Since the parents are bakers, there is probably gluten everywhere, including their clothing. She could constantly be at risk. When my friend and her father were diagnosed with celiac disease, the whole family had to throw out their Tupperware, buy new pans, and she had to quit her job at a food joint because it was enough to make her ill.

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  boojie97  |  45

I actually have a gluten intolerance, an my parents opened a bakery specifically for gluten free goods. It's skyrocketed. Try making gluten free items, and get the news out. It's more common than you think.

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  Justy101  |  45

#46 You do realise that gluten has to be IN the stomach of a gluten-intolerant person in order to make them sick. It's not just absorbed into the skin and it's not airborne.

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  auntycj  |  45

It's not absorbed through the skin, but it IS easily breathed in. Case in point: Mom comes home covered in flour (cause its in the air in a bakery), gives daughter a hug, daughter breathes in said flour which is promptly ingested, and she is riddled with stomach pain and diarrhea for a week. Yeah it's definitely an FML for the parents unless they can switch the bakery to gluten free.

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  DancinL  |  45

Well depending on how old the daughter is if there is stuff around with gluten in it she might eat anyway because she misses it and seeing her parents eat the delicious food she can't eat would probably not help anything.

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  rldostie  |  45

I don't haves glutten intolerance but I eat glutten free. There is so much you can bake, and it will be waaaay healthier for you and your daughter. I would love to find a glutten free bakery!

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  Dracoboxer357  |  27

^ You're correct, you can. My mom became quite decent at cooking with a variety of alternatives once we had my brother diagnosed with Celiac's Disease. It just never tasted quite the same but it was the closest thing he could have. (We still ate normal bread, just made sure to never mix them.)

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  idoam  |  27

16, I was fairly sure you could. I have a close friend with gluten intolerance issues. I've never tried her gluten-free food before, though, so I shall take your word for it.

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Yeah. Rice flour. They thought I was gluten intolerant for years, and that stuff was a life saver.. But more like fuck the daughter's life, her diet became severely limited. It's not fun.

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  nofearjenshere  |  27

They still have to be careful with cross-contamination. My dad has Celiac's disease and we have to have separate things for him, he even has his own toaster for his gluten-free bread.

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  Jezlovespink  |  27

Eh wat the heck if the dr. said cut the glutens out then cut them out plus ive heard a gluten-free diet is healthier n helps loose weight/no.more tummy probs....

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  TheDrifter  |  32

Yeah, I grabbed a loaf by accident once. Even buttered and smothered in honey it just doesn't taste right. There is a japanese bakery near me that specialzes in gluten free rice flour based goods that are quite yummy though.

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  SirCharles83  |  32

My mom has celiacs. I can tell you that if you search well enough, you can find some great gluten-free products that taste pretty good. You just have to know what to look for and where to find it. The part that sucks is having to have your own meals wherever you go, and not being able to eat what everyone else is having. The good news is more and more restaurants have gluten-free menus.

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  bitch_pleez  |  20

I fucking loved those books but I haven't had time to see the movie yet. Is it worth it or will it ruin it for me? I heard Rue was black though so that sucks....

By  DocBastard  |  47

There's absolutely no reason for you and your husband to cut gluten out of your diet. If she has the problem, she's the only one who needs to avoid eating gluten. It's not like she's allergic to gluten and can't come into contact with it. She'll only get symptoms if she eats it. If anyone told you otherwise, he's an idiot and needs to get educated.

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  vanaathiel  |  47

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  Llamacod  |  47

Bladian, its my understanding from past posts that docbastard is a trauma surgeon so it is all together possible that he hasnt much information on gluten allergies. No offense doc. And yes it is possible that even a little bit of gluten could send the daughter into crampy diarrhea fits of pain. Again its possible that the daughter is just a little sensitive to gluten, we don't know the extent of the reaction so the other persons comment is perfectly legit. Again though op and spouse need not cut gluten out if their diet. But it would sick if daughter is severely allergic to gluten as a baker is sure to come home with flour on their clothing

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  LSS_fml  |  47

My sister has Coeliacs disease and has been told to avoid all contact with gluten as it can enter your body through your pores. Are the 2 doctors and one specialist that told her that idiots? If we've been mislead for the past 5 years because of it then that sucks, she's had to knock back jobs because of it.

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  TheDrifter  |  47

The child has been eating gluten containing foods, presumably all her life. If it was an allergy severe enough to prevent contact the first time would have resulted in a hospital visit. As doc and the original post said, it's an intolerance, just make enough dishes to not starve the child avoiding the ones containing gluten, maybe gluten free treats and there is no reason for op to have any major dietary changes.

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  Llamacod  |  47

Yes there is plenty of reason, I would presume that there is a reduction of nutrient absorption if given gluten, so it is entirely possible that by not changing her diet, they would effectually starve the girl to death by giving her gluten products. We don't know op's daughter's history. Is she 2 or 15? If she is 2, is she on the growth curve? Presuming its a mild intolerance, if it was your kid would you be " I don't care if you get sick from this, you will eat this bread and like it" or would you attempt to do anything in your power to help them out?

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  DocBastard  |  47

Vanaathiel - I understand the condition very well, thank you very much. In addition to medical school, we have good friends who have gluten intolerance. Anything else? People with gluten intolerance can touch gluten without problems. It only affects them if they ingest it.

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  celiacbabe5582  |  47

TheDrifter: OH MY GOD. There is no reason for major dietary changes?!! Clearly eating gluten is giving her awful stomach aches and damaging her internal organs (her villi in her small intestine), CLEARLY gluten needs to be cut out of her diet as completely as possible.

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  TheDrifter  |  47

Much appreciated, it seems my comment was confusing, 66 seems to have made the same mistake about who's diet I was referring to. My children eat very differently than I do, so I always prepare a number of dishes, with larger amounts of the foods we all like.

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  benhd1  |  47

While I agree with you on that I think the family is doing it so she doesn't feel so excluded and alone, eating certain types of less tasty food sucks especially so if you're doing it alone. I think it's a considerate thing they may be doing. That or she DOES have an extreme allergy, would be nice if OP could elaborate for everyone...

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  DocBastard  |  47

kittykail13 - NO. Gluten intolerance is NOT an allergy. And I AM a doctor, so I DO know. Gluten intolerance is also known as coeliac disease, and it is NOT an allergic reaction to gluten. There is such a thing as a wheat allergy, but it's a very different disease. Before you go spouting off at the mouth, make sure you know what the hell you're talking about.

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  The_Hitdude  |  47

Doc- Don't sweat people like that. She's (I'm assuming based off of the name that it's a girl) being a hypocrite, telling you that you don't know what you're talking about when she obviously doesn't know what the fuck she's saying. Contrary to popular belief, Gluten intolerance is exactly what it says--an INTOLERANCE. No allergic factors whatsoever. Period. So before you try to tell a Doctor that they don't know what they're saying, kittykail13, get YOUR facts straight. Idiot.

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  mickiethec  |  47

This is true I have celiac and even though I didn't get sick whenever I had gluten before I was diagnosed, I was basically starving myself of nutrients without knowing. Even without huge symptoms, the daughter should definetly go gluten free because it will make a big impact on her energy level and appetite. Celiacs who eat gluten are way more prone to getting certain types of cancer and other sicknesses, so the daughter should really go gluten free. I'm glad I have.

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  auntycj  |  47

I hate how people (including medical professionals, which I am as well) feel the need to differentiate between a wheat allergy and a gluten intolerance. First of all: who cares??? You get sick either way. It's bad for your health either way. Secondly: Doc, I respect your opinions and am in agreement with your posts 99% of the time. But I have a hard time backing your stance on celiac disease this time. Yes, you are correct that a person with celiac disease will not produce a histamine reaction if they come in contact with gluten, however that is no reason to discount the severity of the reaction.

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  auntycj  |  47

Celiac can be extremely debilitating and if it is uncontrolled can contribute to the development of other food allergies and sensitivities as your body is in a constant reactive state. Cross-contamination is also a huge issue, especially if baking is done using wheat (regular) flour in the same kitchen as someone with celiac disease. The flour becomes airborne and can either be breathed in (nasal cavities naturally drain into the stomach), or it can settle on other items that are in the area and will later be used by the individual who is gluten-intolerant such as utensils and dishes. Even trace amounts of gluten from wheat, rye, or barley can cause the body to react and damage the cilia inside the small bowel leading to malabsorption and nutritional deficiencies.

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  auntycj  |  47

This can lead to serious long term medical problems including stunted growth, infertility, depression, osteoporosis, hair loss, eczema, ataxia, and liver disease. With the absolute exception of anaphylactic allergies, a gluten intolerance is much more serious with more far-reaching consequences than food allergies. Again, a life threatening allergy is a completely different story. I apologise Doc for contradicting you, but in this area I feel your expertise is not as in-depth as it is in most other medical situations.

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  DocBastard  |  47

Auntycj - there's no need to apologise for disagreeing with me. I'm not going to apologise for disagreeing with you right now. I never discounted the severity of the problem. I fully understand the pathophysiology of coeliac disease. But if you are indeed a medical professional, then you should know full well why we differentiate between a true allergy and an intolerance - there is a WORLD OF DIFFERENCE. An allergic reaction to wheat can cause anaphylaxis and KILL you. Gluten intolerance can not. How could that be any more clear?

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  cjcjcjx  |  47

actually, coming from someone with gluten intolerance, it is technically an allergy, just an H2 receptor allergy, hence the type of reactions you may get from it. you also should not let it touch any of your food, and some doctors say not to touch it, some say it's not a problem. because some people, like myself, don't get stomach aches alone but may also get other symptoms such as hives, rashes, sores, itchy and sometimes swollen tongue and throat, swollen veins that been like they're on fire, etc. also, it's very hard to find gluten free food, especially some that is appetizing. it's basically in everything. it's hard to just cut it out of your diet completely, especially without support because everyone around you is going to have food with gluten. you can't get fast food or microwaveable. you basically have to make everything from scratch and have it prepared. it's a bigger deal than people believe. good luck to you OP and your family.

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