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By LoadingMeows / Friday 23 September 2016 01:17 / United States
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By  StormfrontX33_fml  |  24

Basic presentation is necessary since you represent the company, so it's kind of a YDI. I work in a fine dining restaurant, so I have to be clean shaven and such. It's all about image sometimes, and not just job performance.

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  interesting33  |  33

I think it depends on the job. If it is a hairdresser or beautician I think that is fair enough to ask someone to use the products and help sell it. But I would hate a job where I had to wear makeup. I have heard of restaurants only hiring conventionally attractive people to be wiating staff or bar staff and the others to work in the back. I don't know if it is legal or not but I strongly disagree with it.

By  StormfrontX33_fml  |  24

Basic presentation is necessary since you represent the company, so it's kind of a YDI. I work in a fine dining restaurant, so I have to be clean shaven and such. It's all about image sometimes, and not just job performance.

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  nskritz  |  3

what a man thing to say.

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  lysx84  |  24

I'm a woman and I totally agree with #2. You have to be presentable in a customer facing role. Not necessarily wearing make up, but if her hair is a dirty riot all the time it's not projecting a good company image.

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  Lalala579121  |  27

If people have actually complained about OP not wearing makeup then I would assume OP has some facial effect people view as a negative. Bags under her eyes, acne, things like that don't necessarily make someone ugly, but they should still be masked in some way to seem presentable in a professional environment.

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  Wishe  |  17

That's like telling someone their nose is too big and looks unappealing in their waitress job. It's completely irrelevant and can't be helped anyway.

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  PhoenixChick  |  22

Being clean shaven is not even nearly the same as wearing make-up and doing your hair. Which for some reason people are taking to mean that OP has dirty messy hair. Doing your hair means having a (subjectively) attractive hairstyle as opposed to just having straight, natural hair.

By  neuronerd  |  28

Where on earth do you work? I mean, I could understand maybe if you don't wash or brush your hair and it's a hygiene issue, but I can't think of any place where makeup would be mandatory or a thing people would complain about.

By  xxDeeStar  |  27

Just out of curiosity, where do you work? If too many customers are complaining, I'm interested to know if your job description had mentioned "makeup" and such. I know that some retail stores and "obviously makeup stores" require it. But if this is a completely unrelated job then seriously, what the heck is wrong with people.. I mean I understand professionalism. So a clean hair-do makes sense. But makeup? It feels weird that a company would be so irrational unless they had a legitimate reason (although it's entirely possible because anything is). Definitely need a follow up! There is too much ambiguity here.

By  Jazzalyn  |  10

Doing your hair should be a standard thing no matter where you work. I'm not dealing with customers face-to-face in my line of work, but I still do mine. And when I think of places customers might expect employees to wear make-up, I think of places where presentation is of a high importance. So I'm leaning towards a YDI, but a follow-up is needed to make a definite decision.

By  bobslawnservice  |  16

You deserve it. You didn't get written up for being ugly - you got written up for not making an effort to look presentable.

By  wmayrhofer  |  12

Grow up, it's not about your ugliness, it's about your attitude.

By  wmayrhofer  |  12

They knew what you looked like when they hired you. So it's about your attitude. YDI

By  GhostFox  |  33

If your workplace has one, get an employee hand book, and go over the section that details workplace appearance. If the book doesn't say anything about having to do those things, go to HR or somewhere else that has the authority to help you. If your workplace doesn't have a handbook, ask for a written set of guidelines. If they won't supply that, ask them how you're supposed to meet standards that they won't inform you about.

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