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By iLikeMyLegs / Thursday 9 May 2013 23:18 / Canada - Oshawa
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  missfrenchie  |  11

But seriously... Parents, they just assume the worst in everything, you'll be fine if you continue on with the medications that your doctor recommends and don't worry you leg won't be cut off ):

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  MuseFan1991  |  14

to be fair, at least it sounded like they were willing to accommodate their lives around OPs imaginary amputation. too many parents nowadays see their sons and daughters go through imaginary operations and pretend pregnancies and turn their backs

By  Catahoulaqueen_fml  |  17

I think you parents are a BRAIN eating disease...

By  Booda_Shun  |  28

What kind of "parents" do people consider themselves these days? They were openly pessimistic about OP for something they didn't know about. Bring on the state-mandated parental eligibility tests. :)

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  Booda_Shun  |  28

I'm not talking forced sterilization... I'm just saying that not everyone is meant to start a successful family. I know these tests will never happen; it's just fun to pipedream :)

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  SMHsohard  |  22

#14: First of all, MRSA is not a death sentence; everyone has it on their skin. All it is, is a mutated bacteria that 30 years ago was considered a normal skin flora. It's only an issue for already debilitated patients, if you're in generally good health, the infection will clear with treatment.

By  rttr  |  18

Don't worry, it will most likely not come to an amputation. Even if it does, your parents shouldn't be discussing it so close to you. Even if they are overly worried, at least they care about you enough to worry

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  Booda_Shun  |  28

Assuming they can medicate it fast enough, and if the disease is friable. If it's MRSA, poor OP unfortunately is doomed; his new best friend will be a prosthetic leg...

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  SMHsohard  |  22

Booda_Shun, stop reading the tabloids. MRSA is everywhere, you probably have it on your skin. It's only a serious issue if you're already debilitated, a generally healthy person will respond to IV antibiotics. MRSA is a strain of staph that mutated over the years, largely because people demanded antibiotics for every cough and sniffle. 30 years ago, that strain was considered normal skin flora and no one worried about it too much, because it was easily treated if it caused an infection/cellulitis.

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  Booda_Shun  |  28

DocBastard, you're in Europe, right? There must be some differences in our strains. Here in America, everything that walks, talks, and/or has 4 legs and eats from a feedlot receives broad-spectrum antibiotics at some point. My hypothesis is that since Europe may not be as liberal with the use of antibiotics, the strain of MRSA there is much more manageable than it is here in the US...

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  DrSo  |  15

Ugh. Okay. Staph (Staphylococcus) is a type of bacteria everyone carries, commonly on the skin. MRSA (methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus) is a strain of antibiotic resistant staphylococcus that NOT everyone carries. When you go to a hospital (in the US, I'm not sure about other countries), we will ask if you are a MRSA carrier, so we know what antibiotics we can and can't use. It is not a guaranteed death sentence/amputation or anything like that, it just requires more aggressive treatment with different antibiotics.

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  DrSo  |  15

#49 the whole "broad spectrum use of antibiotics" thing in cattle doesn't really affect human health as much as the media claims. It does select for resistant bacterial strains, but they are mainly cattle diseases that cannot be transferred to human (though there are RARE cases of zoonotic diseases). You should be more worried about the broad spectrum use of antibiotic agents in cleaning products and over-prescription of antibiotics in humans, which both contribute to selecting for resistant strains of human pathogens.

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  Booda_Shun  |  28

#52 Humans can contract E. Coli, for instance, just as easily as cattle can store it in their tissues unharmed. Especially the insidious O157:H7 strain that is such a great health risk. That pathogen itself is highly resistant to many antibiotics and you intend to say that heavy antibiotic use in the beef industry is of little concern? Don't listen to the USDA.

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