15
Add a comment
You must be logged in to be able to post comments!
Create my account Sign in
Top comments
By  Kylyn Estoesta  |  5

Not that bad, for whole day, the soup of the day at my work was Split Pee. How appetizing.

Comments
By  jbuckets_404  |  44

Bad spelling doesn't matter as long as everybody else on-site reading said words knows what the chefs mean. However, ordering same-named items from vendors/ suppliers won't "fly!" lol I once had (what I didn't know until after the fact) a non-English-speaking chef put onions on my pizza because he didn't know that the waittress' notation of "-O" on the order meant (for her reference) to put extra oregano on the side when delivered at the table. LOL!

By  jbuckets_404  |  44

OP, then I certainly hope that the ingredient/ food item literally called "for shit" isn't ever ordered by a customer at your restaurant 'cuz it will thus be left out of his dinner due to its misunderstood misspelling! ;-) LOL!

By  Kylyn Estoesta  |  5

Not that bad, for whole day, the soup of the day at my work was Split Pee. How appetizing.

By  Ewokhunter01  |  42

I have known a lot of chefs from working in restaurants for years. I know that a lot of chefs start out via apprenticeships. For a lot of them, that means they quit school to take up a trade. Spelling doesn't mean much when you are in the kitchen as long as people know what you mean. Kitchens are often very fast-paced which means chefs/apprentices don't have time to make sure their spelling is correct. Its rude to make assumptions.

By  lezlgcy  |  1

Did you expect something different? Aside from everything being abbreviated, by the time ur a chef you've killed so many brain cells I'm surprised some of them can right(kidding)write at all. Maybe they should get the dish dog to transcribe!

Loading data…