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This Woman Tried To Bring Her ‘Emotional Support Peacock’ On A United Flight And They Were Not Having It

By Nina / jeudi 1 février 2018 10:00
Airlines have seen a lot of support animals in the past couple years, but this was the first time anyone tried to bring a peacock onto a plane. Of course, we’re all for you getting the support you need, but sitting behind a peacock? That’s an FML no one can excuse.

We get it, and we’re all for support animals. They’re a fantastic way to help people cope with any mental health issues that may hinder them in stressful situations, like flying. But what was at first a dog or sometimes cat, the scope of what counts as a support animal now ranges from hedgehogs to spiders. It was only a matter of time before someone tried to board with a peacock.

That brings us to United Airlines’ most recent mention in the news, which for people who’ve have to put up with unruly “support animals” on planes, is surprisingly sympathetic.

I’m a peacock, captain. You gotta let me fly!

The Jet Set shared these images of a woman at Newark Airport with her emotional support peacock.

According to Live and Let's Fly, United denied this woman of bringing her peacock on board, after she had already arrived at the gate with it. She then offered to buy a ticket for the bird and was still denied.

In a statement from United in response to this event, they said:

"This animal did not meet guidelines for a number of reasons, including its weight and size. We explained this to the customers on three separate occasions before they arrived at the airport."

Understandable. For those of you who may not realize, peacocks can be up to 7.5 feet long (2.3 meters). Not to mention the whole peacocking thing with the feather fan (note this very scientific and professional wording), you can imagine how impractical a peacock would be on a plane.

This instance comes after Delta Airlines’ statement last week cracking down on support animal regulations, saying that the system for regulating inflight animals was too lenient, leading to “more untrained animals being brought onto planes, where they urinate, defecate, bark, growl, lunge and exhibit other behavior uncommon among companions that are properly taught.”

I don’t know about you, but to us, getting mauled by a support animal on a plane sounds more stressful than soothing.

While chances are low that Dexter the Peacock (it's his real name, you can check out his Insta) was going to maul anyone, I think it’s safe to say that keeping Dexter grounded was an FML avoided.

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By  PhoenixChick  |  24

Actually you've got pretty good odds of being mauled by a peacock on an airplane, given the unlikely event that the peacock is allowed on. Peacocks are, of course, male. They are territorial, do not like strange environments, and their defense mechanism involves leaping up to low hanging branches. Plus they have some nasty claws. On a place, "low hanging branch" would translate easily to "top of the airplane seat" and then you've got what is essentially a stressed out bird the size of an average dog armed with small knives and right at the level of your face.

Plus peacocks make a horrible racket.

Comments
By  PhoenixChick  |  24

Actually you've got pretty good odds of being mauled by a peacock on an airplane, given the unlikely event that the peacock is allowed on. Peacocks are, of course, male. They are territorial, do not like strange environments, and their defense mechanism involves leaping up to low hanging branches. Plus they have some nasty claws. On a place, "low hanging branch" would translate easily to "top of the airplane seat" and then you've got what is essentially a stressed out bird the size of an average dog armed with small knives and right at the level of your face.

Plus peacocks make a horrible racket.

Reply

Hello panic attack .No one understands what a panic attack is until they have felt it personally the physical symptoms alone have been misdiagnosed as a heart or asthma attack. Along with the overwhelming fear, but don't worry other flyers, I hope my panic attack doesn't bother you on your flight.

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  wiccaantje  |  20

I understand panic attacks as I have severe arachnofobia and just a picture of a spider can lead to a panic attack. The article says the airport has had spiders as support animals on the plane... Is their need for a support animal bigger and more important then my need to not freak out and start crying and being absolutely panicked because there is a tarantula on the plane?How exactly do I explain my need to not sit next to the giant spider when I didn't have the expectation that I would need to inform anyone of that fobia and because of that, don't have a medical receipt. I can expect many people to not want to sit next to it, even without a fobia. So it's likely that the airport will need evidence of that fobia, even though I won't have it, because I didn't expect to subjected to my fobia on the plane. And that's just me with my arachnafobia, a fobia of birds is also very common. Peacocks are giant birds. And again, people are not going to want to sit near the bird even if they don't have a fobia. If you make the decision to get an uncommon support animal, then you make the choice to sometimes be limitated by your support animal. Especially if that support animal is huge.

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  fooltemptress  |  35

There was no “sudden denial” by United Airlines. She was told several times before she ever arrived at the airport that they would not allow the peacock to board.

This was a publicity stunt by the artist and nothing more. The peacock was originally purchased for an art installation and given away immediately after it was completed before she decided it would be cool to keep as a pet. She showed up at the airport and took pictures as she wasted everyone’s time for several hours just so she could have the images go viral on her Instagram, ultimately advertising herself and her upcoming art show.

If you honestly need an emotional support animal, do yourself a favor and get a PTSD/ Anxiety dog. They are fully trained service dogs that provide actual medical help instead of just a security blanket in the form of an animal. They can alert you to a panic attack before it happens, help you find an exit in a public location, provide compression therapy, and even wake you up from nightmares among many other things.

By  wolf_wizard1134  |  9

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  assassinmaster  |  21

Duh! So a self-entitled little princess like you needs a few pampering “meetings” to understand that you are not supposed to bring a fucking peacock or an elephant or a giraffe as a “comfort animal” on a fucking plane full of other people.

Reply

Hey genius....guess you missed the part where they denied her request 3 separate times before she even arrived. Publicity stunt to gain views on her Instagram and get her 15 minutes.

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