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By dramateach11 - / Friday 3 April 2009 00:37 / United States
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By  ecrw  |  6

Actually that's an excellent way to approach drama, by conjuring up personal emotions actors can put themselves closer to their characters. You should considering giving her some extra marks for that. I remember in drama class the best actor of the whole class would remember real life situations in order to cry and get closer to her character.

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By  ecrw  |  6

Actually that's an excellent way to approach drama, by conjuring up personal emotions actors can put themselves closer to their characters. You should considering giving her some extra marks for that. I remember in drama class the best actor of the whole class would remember real life situations in order to cry and get closer to her character.

By  Ybot_fml  |  5

@#7, that's called substitution. I go to the Setlla-Adler Acting School and that's actually frowned upon for using because it doesn't show emotions for the character, but just yours juxtaposed into the scene. Also, I've been told numerous times that the best way to cry on stage is to just get so much into your character that the tears flow truthfully. THAT'S when it's good acting.

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  JhasNeeh  |  5

Originally a section of Stanislavski's System called 'Emotion Memory'. I'm training to be a drama teacher and one of the first things we learnt when we covered the System was that 'Emotion Memory' is not to be used in schools as it's actually very dangerous. Stanislavski did comment on a good performer actually using their emotions as part of a character in this way because it makes it more real to the performer. It alters the character for every actor that attempts the role - but that's not a bad thing. The Characters need to stay linked to the actors so they appear human and not a wooden copy.

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I know what you mean--a good actor will get so involved with his/her character that the emotions will become their own. I once went to a play where the emotional stakes were very high, and it took ten minutes for the lead actress to break character after it was over. I've experienced this myself, as a dancer. Obviously it doesn't produce the same effect, but if the dance is extremely dramatic, it takes a minute to come back to the real world instead of the one onstage.

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