By fed up - 23/08/2018 23:30

Today, I bought a different car because I was having to constantly repair my old one. On the way home from the dealer, the check engine light came on. FML
I agree, your life sucks 2 771
You deserved it 199

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Buy a cheap engine scanner. They are easy to use. You follow the directions and read out the code which is usually decided in the instructions that came with the item. Harbor Freight often has then for under $50. It is well worth it to see what the check engine light is telling you. I had an older Chevy pickup that used to get the check engine light after every big storm and showed as a minor pollution system leak - I think the rapid change in barometer pressure was setting it off. I would reset the indication with the tester per its instructions. Pay wife’s older PT Cruiser occasionally gets that indication and when checked it actually shows no fault. I restart the car’s computer by disconnecting one terminal of the car battery (with car off) for a couple of minutes and then reconnect and that fixes that. By the way I am an electronic engineer. Even if you cannot fix the problem knowing the trouble code and looking it up online will get you an idea of if it’s a serious problem or not. That way if the mechanic tries to screw you over, you know to take you car elsewhere. And by the way, the seller should make good on the problem given the timing.

Lemon laws must not exist where you live

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Lemon laws must not exist where you live

What is a lemon law? Can't sell a bad car law?

Wikipedia says: "Lemon laws are American state laws that provide a remedy for purchasers of cars and other consumer goods in order to compensate for products that repeatedly fail to meet standards of quality and performance."

That if you get a bad car then you can return it before a certain time

Lemon Laws only apply to brand new vehicles.

Shop for a used Toyota and before you buy take it to a mechanic you can trust to make sure it's in good shape.

This same exact problem happened to me with a used Toyota from a dealership. The make of the car really has nothing to do with it.

I've never had a problem with any of my Mercedes.

Yeah... you’ve got a case of the invisible gremlins. My sympathies.

Never trust dealers, sometimes they tamper with their goods...

Buy a cheap engine scanner. They are easy to use. You follow the directions and read out the code which is usually decided in the instructions that came with the item. Harbor Freight often has then for under $50. It is well worth it to see what the check engine light is telling you. I had an older Chevy pickup that used to get the check engine light after every big storm and showed as a minor pollution system leak - I think the rapid change in barometer pressure was setting it off. I would reset the indication with the tester per its instructions. Pay wife’s older PT Cruiser occasionally gets that indication and when checked it actually shows no fault. I restart the car’s computer by disconnecting one terminal of the car battery (with car off) for a couple of minutes and then reconnect and that fixes that. By the way I am an electronic engineer. Even if you cannot fix the problem knowing the trouble code and looking it up online will get you an idea of if it’s a serious problem or not. That way if the mechanic tries to screw you over, you know to take you car elsewhere. And by the way, the seller should make good on the problem given the timing.

Or just get it scanned for free at Autozone or any other car parts place.

Check is engine light is only for emission related issues. it could be as simple as you leaving the gas cap loose.

It can be more than emissions issues, but can be s simple as the gas cap not being tightened properly.

Your engine about to blow up does not trigger a check engine light. only emission related stuff does, spark plugs. wires. bad o2 sensor. bad catalytic converter etc.

Clearly you have no clue about cars. Let the other men handle this