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By Saddoc - / Friday 26 July 2013 07:58 / Australia - Dalkeith
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By  Queensland  |  27

Comment moderated or buried due to negative votes. Show the comment

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  Queensland  |  27

Actually I think I'm hilarious! But thanks for your input :)

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  Queensland  |  27

Everyone simmer down. Jeez it's a fucking banter website. Remove cacti from asses.

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  Baustigt  |  40

Now, now, people. Can't we settle our differences without the torches and the pitchforks? Sure, angry mobs are fun and all, but - Oh, wait. It's Queensland. Burn the witch! *hurls Molotov*

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  Queensland  |  27

This sure is an interesting way to go. But now I realise I'd probably down vote me too.

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  Ambient25  |  24

I blame Skyrim for missing out

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#40 there are those who are funny, like doc, there are those who are unfunny, like you, and there are those who are punny, like noor

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  TheChantell  |  5

I found your comment funny #1

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The only one who seems to have cacti in their ass is you

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  Lacist  |  19

I don't think you realize you're conceited as fuck. Telling people to calm down to an extremely arrogant reply is just idiotic, what else are you expecting? Just admit it.

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  einselar  |  6

I thought It was hilarious. Smartasses unite!

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  Nekogami  |  14

Eh. I found this funny. I mean honestly. Why all the hate? Thumb me down all you want. It's a shitty situation - and the only way I psychologically can deal is with humour. OP - I'm sorry your patient's daughter is a fucking moron. #1 I am sorry so many people found this offensive. I found it funny in a twisted sadistic sort of way.

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  Booda_Shun  |  28

So I guess #1's comment was just in poor taste.

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  roseofwinter  |  1

I laughed at #1. Yea death is sad, but life is kinda sucky or this site wouldn't exist. People need to see the humor in death to make life better. And your comment was awesome.

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  threer  |  30

Doc is the best FMLer on here, but I have to say I love Queensland..

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  drummerp64  |  16

I completely disagree with this opinion, but that's just my opinion. Just putting it out there: not everyone would hate this. Edit: Shoot, I misread this. I thought it said half-clove. Yeah, a half-cup is a little bit much, even for me.

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  Blackcatluck  |  19

It was a patient not a family member

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  monnanon  |  13

its still a loss if you have had them as a paitent for a while. she cared enough to go the the funeral and thats not standard proceedure for doctors and nurses.

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  8born8  |  18

#25 he might not have been family, it's about showing some fucking respect to the deceased & if the op went to his funeral, then he obviously established a connection with the deceased. bloody hell thick or what?!

By  mireaux  |  7

I really, really hope it wasn't an open casket event.

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  gc327072  |  29

If one ate THAT much garlic it's likely to be emanating from all their pores, meaning they would reek of garlic. Happened to me after I ate a Russian meat pie, and discovered those "lumps" in it were solid cloves.

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  llama612  |  27

I hope so, I live in Australia and this just sounds really off. Especially if the daughter was the carer should have to follow doctors orders. If she wasn't giving him the proper care then at minimum this is neglect, at worse this could be murder or at least manslaughter. Either we need more information about this or OP should be reporting the daughter to the police.

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  sweet23_fml  |  11

it all depends, I am a carer and i can get told to stop administering medication to a resident at the request of the family. but really garlic is good for you, but not that good.

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  BubbleGrunge  |  18

I have to call you out on the whole homeopathic thing, many of those remedies DO work. Garlic is, in fact, good for your heart but not in the way the daughter believed. Also, I'm a firm believer in many homeopathic remedies over prescription drugs because I've seen first hand the positive effects they have. A good friend of my had lymphoma and was told the treatments weren't working and she's have a few months to a year to live. She started on a homeopathic treatments at a place in Atlanta, and five years later she's still in remission. However, taking an elderly patient off all their heart medication without guidance from someone in the medical field is behind stupid and negligent. Sometimes, even homeopathic remedies can't help with medicine can.

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  jococo7787  |  3

homeopathy might be good sometimes, but in the probably unstable condition the now dead patient was, it would be too risky to suddenly take him off his meds like that. if his daughter would switch to homeopathy (still not recommended) at the right time, it would probably be when his condition becomes more stabilized and he is at no immediate risk.

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  DocBastard  |  38

Bubblegrunge, you knew damn well I wouldn't let this go. Homeopathy is pseudoscience at best and bullshit quackery at worst. The concept that water can somehow "remember" what's been diluted in it flies in the face of science. It doesn't do anything other than promote the placebo effect, which IS real. Now you don't have to believe in science, but that doesn't make it any less right.

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  monnanon  |  13

garlic isnt homeopathic though. homeopathy is taking the functiong bit of the medicine and diluting it down. yes garlic is good for the heart ( and stomach) mint and ginger are good for indigestion and stuff like eachanicia is good at staving of colds. however if my heart or stomach was in any danger of killing me i would take the meds perscribed.

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  mansen  |  15

I think you are getting homeopathy confused with naturopathy. Homeopathy is the useless sugar pills that have the water and the so called 'memory' of the whatever cure you want retained in it due to the dilutions of umpteenth times and the knocking of the flask umpteenth times as well too. Quackery. Naturopathy is...well....very few actual true scientific studies on their work. I would call it a support of a healthy lifestyle in conjunction with western medicine but you never go off your meds for a life threateninh condition. None of the so called natural remedies or herbal medicines have really gone through through or have to go through the rigorous trials and testing for proof of what they claim they do and for safety like pharmaceuticals do before they are put on the market. And yes there have been many cases of pharmaceutical oopsies that have had to be taken off the market afterwards but, again, still remember, no natural medicine had to go throigh controlled studies, double blind tests, had to be published in proper peer reviewed journals etc etc. and natural medicine industry is and industry too. Out for profit. Worth billions. Almost worth as much as the pharmaceutical industry. Not just existing to make you feel all warm and fuzzy.

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  RedPillSucks  |  30

I thought homeopathy was the stuff that happened to medicine before science got a hold of it. Like eating the roots of a certain plant (or drinking tea made from it) to get rid of a headache. Science takes the plant and makes a pill called aspirin, and now it's medicine. I've never heard of this water dilution thing that y'all are talking about.

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  TheDrifter  |  23

Rps, a lot of people have been using the word homeopathy instead of naturopathy lately and it's confused the meaning. What you thought was homeopathy is naturopathy and homeopathy is quackery trying to ride on naturopathy's name and time tested moderate results

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#76: Homeopathy is quackery that relies on two assumptions. First is that 'like cures like', so the cure for a headache is something that causes headaches. Second is that a treatment becomes stronger with each dilution, because the water 'remembers' substances it was in contact with. Homeopathic remedies are diluted in stages, generally in a 1:10 or 1:100 ratio, and this is repeated many times. Often, there is not a single molecule of the active ingredient left, but homeopaths would have you believe this is a potent remedy because of the water's memory effect. Of course, they ignore a crucial flaw in the memory hypothesis: if water really did have such a memory, then it would 'remember' every impurity and toxin it had ever touched, and would be extremely deadly. Homeopathy shows a profound misunderstanding of how the world works, and governments should force vendors of these 'remedies' to label them as to what they really contain, which is generally either plain water or sugar.

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  ForFudgeSake  |  6

It's called preventative medicine. Eat healthy, eat superfoods, and omitt chemicals from your diet and you're decreasing your likelihood of sickness immensely. Also 'Bad Pharma' is a good book on this topic.

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