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By  grtfuldeadlovr  |  27

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

By  PackardBell_fml  |  19

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  LyingBlood  |  8

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  JohnnyKade  |  24

Christians do not hate Jews. I'm a Christian and, speaking for the majority, we don't hate anyone. People who hate Jews whether Christian or not are stupid. People who hate any other people for my reason are stupid and irrational.

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  BrotherPhil  |  27

No he was killed by the Romans, on what was effectively a charge of terrorism, after offending the Sanhedrin, who considered him a blasphemer and a threat to their power. The Sanhedrin could have executed him themselves, for blasphemy, but didn't want to because he was so popular.

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  interesting33  |  32

#43, I agree with you, I think that making jokes about Jews though is largely in poor taste (though a lot of my friends do). I don't know. Just be wary, because often bad things (in extreme forms, leading to segregation, Holocausts or genocide) start with something called antilocution. This is where jokes are made to show a group of people in poor light (Jehovah Witnesses, Jews, Homosexuals, Muslims immigrants etc.) and it becomes a common joke. This can lead to people thinking that being in that group is a bad thing and can lead to derogatory words being used for these groups (swarms, hoardes, cockroaches, scum, niggers) and that is when you are in trouble. Then, if these attitudes and thinking becomes common-place, people in these groups will be treated differently for being in this group, and discrimination starts. They may also feel unwelcome (e.g. if people make gay jokes or use gay as a bad word 'that's so gay' then someone who is gay might feel like that is a bad thing and unable to tell someone their sexuality). Eventually antilocution can lead to scapegoating and lawful discrimination and even genocide (Rwandan Genocide - a big sign this was going to happen was when political leaders called the Tutsis 'cockroaches').

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  Tripartita  |  42

That's a nice use of the No True Scotsman Fallacy. Anyway, she can always ask for forgiveness later and be redeemed… anybody can. Even the worst people can feel spiritually exonerated after doing relativity little.

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  Xamry14  |  10

It's a little more complicated than that. Yes, if you mess up you can repent and be forgiven but you have to mean it. If you lie, gamble, and cheat, pray and say sorry, then lie gamble and cheat again, it won't work. Intentions mean more than anything.

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  pjsr  |  27

She didn't say no true Christian would hate Jews. She just said most don't. Disagree if you think most do, but that's not a 'No true Scotsman' argument.

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  Tripartita  |  42

She started out by saying most don't, and /right/ after that, she said that just fake/false Christians do. I agree that most don't hate Jews, I just don't agree that those who do are fake, untrue Christians.

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  the_real_dvd  |  21

#21 it's in Hebrews 10:26- "Dear friends, if we deliberately continue sinning after we have received knowledge of the truth, there is no longer any sacrifice that will cover these sins."

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  the_real_dvd  |  21

As far as #12 statement that no true Christian would hate a Jew, I would have to reference Acts 10:34,35- "Then Peter began to speak: “I now realize how true it is that God does not show favoritism but accepts from every nation the one who fears him and does what is right." A person can call himself a Christian, but the definition of Christian means "Christ like", so we follow in his footsteps. The scriptures portray Christ as self sacrificing and loving to all people. One of his most famous parables is of the Good Samaritan, a parable which showed the love that should exist between two groups normally at odds with each other. I'm compelled to agree with #12. A true Christian hates nobody.

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  Tripartita  |  42

Thank God for Christians like you, The Real DVD. Although, I find your definition of "Christian" to be narrow. If it's all about being Christ-like, anybody who doesn't sell all their possessions and give to the poor wouldn't be a true Christian.

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  the_real_dvd  |  21

You're misinterpreting something Jesus said directly to someone claiming to want to be one of his disciples. Jesus could see by his heart condition that his material assets would prevent him from following him. It's akin to the illustration that if your eye is making you stumble you should tear it out. Jesus was testing that man's true motives, to be acknowledged as a follower of Christ in appearance only, or to actually be a disciple. Nowhere in the scriptures does it say money is wrong. In fact is says money is "for a protection". It's the love of money that is wrong. And FYI- this test proved its merit when the man left Jesus distraught. He had no intention of faithfully following Christ. He was looking for the glory of men.

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  Tripartita  |  42

Perhaps I am misinterpreting that passage, but that doesn't make earthly possessions any more Christ-like. He also spent his time wandering the streets and gathering followers. Yet you can be a true Christian without doing either of those things. How much like Christ do you have to be to be considered a "true Christian"?

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  the_real_dvd  |  21

Jesus left us only two commandments. The first he said was to love his father, our God, with your whole heart, mind, and soul. The second was to love your neighbor as yourself. (Mark 12:30). Before he ascended to heaven he left his disciples one final instruction, this was found in Matthew 28:19, 20. Here he commanded his disciples to "go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all the things I have commanded you. And look! I am with you all the days until the conclusion of the system of things." Nowhere did Jesus say we are to take a vow of poverty. In fact, many of his first century apostles had careers and homes and families not associated with his church, including the Apostle Peter, to whom Jesus had entrusted the keys of his kingdom.

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