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Today, my sixteen-year-old daughter put her soda in the microwave to “cool it down by making the ice cubes melt faster”. FML

By Bapt82 - / Sunday 7 August 2016 14:35 / Switzerland - Luzern
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By  Magnoxidans  |  19

If you place a closed, room temperature soda can in icy water and add salt, the salt causes the ice to melt rapidly resulting in a quickly cooled beverage in about 60 seconds. This is such a cool little trick to know :D

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By  Magnoxidans  |  19

If you place a closed, room temperature soda can in icy water and add salt, the salt causes the ice to melt rapidly resulting in a quickly cooled beverage in about 60 seconds. This is such a cool little trick to know :D

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  tantanpanda  |  26

#33, the original comment says that the can is closed, meaning you're not putting the salt in the soda. You're essentially making a colder than normal ice bath for your drink so it will cool faster. This is an example of colligative properties. Same thing with adding salt to pasta; the water will boil at a higher temperature. Likewise, solvent with solute will depress the freezing point. If that didn't make sense, you're basically throwing salt in a bucket of ice water. The ice will gain heat to convert into water and the heat comes from the water environment, which is why the water gets colder. Colder water = colder drink.

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  piker117  |  11

Adding salt to the water your cooking pasta in does not noticeably raise the boiling point unless your adding more salt than the same amount of ocean water has in it and at that point your pasta would taste like garbage. The reason you add salt to pasta water is to give the pasta some salt so it tastes better

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  esteroth  |  2

you're talking about a 6 year old, bud...

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  tantanpanda  |  26

No, it's still false in theory too. If it's ice water, the water and ice are at thermal equilibrium (both at 0°C), assuming you are using a lot of ice and you're trying to make your drink colder, which is what it sounds like in the OP's story. The melting ice would not make the drink colder because, in theory, they are both at the same temperature. If the water loses heat to the environment, the water will be above 0°C, which would be providing energy for the ice to melt. The system would still be at 0°, especially if no heat is lost to the surrounding (since you're saying in theory)

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