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By Crazy cat lady / Friday 10 April 2015 15:20 / Canada - Winnipeg
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By  Gidget_mom  |  6

It's likely because your cat misses the other cat. My cat did the same thing for a few days after our other cat passed away. Vets suggest allowing other pets to see/sniff the deceased pet so that they have a better understanding of why they are gone.

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  ptoka  |  15

First thought that came to my mind. When my chocolate lab passed my cat, who had been around all his life, began going to call his favorite spots and crying. We had to sit her down and tell her that he wasn't coming back home, oddly that settled her down.

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  teentee401  |  36

I used to have two cats who were brothers from the same litter. One of them got out and never came back, and the other just cries all the time now. It's heartbreaking.

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  socialproduct  |  18

My first thought too. Poor cat misses its friend. I hope you gave him/her some extra affection, OP. The amount of noise that the cat's making shouldn't be your biggest concern.

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  StarDust5921  |  16

Cats grieve too...My boyfriend was killed in a car accident 6 months ago. My cat howls and still looks for him walking in behind me whenever I come home from work. As if I'm not heart broken enough, that hurts me too. Poor little guy.

By  Gidget_mom  |  6

It's likely because your cat misses the other cat. My cat did the same thing for a few days after our other cat passed away. Vets suggest allowing other pets to see/sniff the deceased pet so that they have a better understanding of why they are gone.

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  Vestin  |  18

#3: Should we WANT the cat to understand? It's "He's gone; I can't find him; I might never see him again" vs "He's dead; This is his corpse; There is nothing that can be done". I don't know what it's like to BE a cat, but introducing them to the concept of (by proxy - their own) mortality might be somewhat cruel if educational...

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  Gidget_mom  |  6

#27 it's pretty widely accepted that animals are already pretty aware of they're mortality, so to speak. That is why lots of animals will wander away from their pack/herd/family/(other various group name) or hide in their home when they are about to pass. The idea here is that if the other animal is just gone, then the surviving animal doesn't have any understanding as to why and will become depressed while waiting for the deceased to return. If they are allowed to see the passed animal then they may still be sad, but at least they will understand why their friend is gone and won't be coming back.

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Cats will do that. They hide when they pass away. Usually somewheres warm and soft. Dogs understand death and so do cats. Elephants mourn their dead for a couple days and then move on. Apes do the same thing.

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  Frammy007  |  7

Wouldn't you rather know one of your closest family members (that's most likely how these cats viewed each other) had passed away than simply waiting and wondering? This is the reason why missing-persons cases leave such an emotional and psychological impact on loved ones. Animals, especially domesticated ones, are conscious of more than most people are willing to accept. OP I hope you have the chance to help your cat understand what happened. If you have pictures of the other cat, or even videos of the cats together, that you could show your cat it might help.

By  ImBetterInPerson  |  11

That's why you should get an animal that won't claw your eyes out in your sleep. A dog for instance

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  Frammy007  |  7

I wanted to make a similar joke but this is no laughing matter. An animal is grieving at best, and is at worst confused and depressed. You should take inspiration from the animal you seem to favour and provide unconditional support and compassion to OP; you know that's what a dog would do.

By  irishmaiden78  |  23

Your cat is definitely grieving. Give it a few days to realize that the other cat is gone and won't be coming back and the meowing and yowling will settle down. In the mean time, give your cat some extra play time to distract it from pacing and yowling. It's calming and will get some pent up anxiety and energy out.

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