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By  Niresque  |  2

That really depends on the medical book. If it recommends using quicksilver (mercury) as a cure for syphilis, or as a more drastic one, tells you to bathe in the internal organs of a freshly killed fox, I'd say he's right on the money. If you're using modern medical books though, that's an entirely different story.

By  squiros  |  2

he's actually correct. medical books - and actually all books, are unlikely to be up to date with technology. scientists - essentially all of them, have moved to Peer Reviewed Journals, which can be found online. prjs will almost always be correct and have the advantage of being updated as more research is done. the reason they're always right is because they are tested frequently. so if i claim 'ctc1 is a promoter for GC pairs which protects telomers', i will put it on a prj and many scientists around the world will go and test ctc1 to see if it can actually stop cancer.

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By  Niresque  |  2

That really depends on the medical book. If it recommends using quicksilver (mercury) as a cure for syphilis, or as a more drastic one, tells you to bathe in the internal organs of a freshly killed fox, I'd say he's right on the money. If you're using modern medical books though, that's an entirely different story.

By  squiros  |  2

he's actually correct. medical books - and actually all books, are unlikely to be up to date with technology. scientists - essentially all of them, have moved to Peer Reviewed Journals, which can be found online. prjs will almost always be correct and have the advantage of being updated as more research is done. the reason they're always right is because they are tested frequently. so if i claim 'ctc1 is a promoter for GC pairs which protects telomers', i will put it on a prj and many scientists around the world will go and test ctc1 to see if it can actually stop cancer.

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  tantanpanda  |  26

Thing is, the professor the paper is for is English. There would most likely be nothing specific enough in English that would warrant super up to date medical information. I think the professor is just salty, but not enough info anyway.

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That's relative though. Most medical knowledge is still relevant or at least for the most part still the standard of care. I'm not really sure of the details of this, it seems that it would really depend on the information in particular though

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  blair_kitty  |  15

depending on the assignment the teacher could have had an instruction to use actual books and not websites to cite his essay. I had a humanities teacher that we use 2 books to cite our essays, unfortunately all the medical books we needed were taken out of the library by medical students. when i told her about this she suggested i go to the major medical university in my city and use their medical library. This wasn't even program class, it was a general ed i needed to take in order to graduate. This woman obviously didn't realise i was taking 6 other courses that semester and all teachers have roughly the same due date.

By  RichardPencil  |  22

He could be right. Medical science is always changing and you should state "facts" with some degree of caution. Look into the story of H. pylori and stomach ulcers and you'll see an unbelievable tale of dogma and its overturning,

By  JillianJuneBug  |  31

Something similar to that happened with my writing professor and I last year. She refused to let me cite my psychology textbook. The one that I bought from the COLLEGE store.

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