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Get your nephew a pet bunny and tell him that you were asked by the Easter Bunny to have him raise and care for the bunny. It'll distract him and he'll learn a thing or two about being a good pet owner.

so explain to your nephew that your brother in law is a jerk and he's playing a prank. I'm not an Easter Bunny person, but you don't screw with kids like that. it's up to his parents if they want to reveal that type of stuff

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Feels better? I think this is more of a Fuck the nephew's life. That asshole just ruined the kids childhood why would he feel better?

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Get your nephew a pet bunny and tell him that you were asked by the Easter Bunny to have him raise and care for the bunny. It'll distract him and he'll learn a thing or two about being a good pet owner.

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Actually rabbits are tons of mess and work and a lot of times they don't survive their first year with an inexperienced owner so then the kid would think he personally killed the Easter bunny.

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^^I'm sure the parents would only do this if they were prepared to help the kid raise it. Or it could turn into a lesson about life and death :/

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#19, no, not "parenting win".. or even "uncle/aunt win"... A rabbit is an animal that is a huge responsibility, it is not a toy you willy nilly give to a child. Too many rabbits sadly end up dead only a few weeks after being carelessly given away as gifts for Easter. Unless their nephew demonstrates a readiness for caring for what is a delicate pet, it is best to get them a stuffed rabbit than risk the life of a real one.just because of a relative's reckless insensitivity

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34, no matter the age of the child, any good parent willing to gift a rabbit to the child also knows it's their equal responsibility to teach the child how to care for the animal and to pick up the slack if the child forgets to do necessary tasks like feeding or cleaning their cage. So, yes, it is a parenting win. It means the parent has the foresight to soften the hurt emotions of the child by teaching them a lifelong skill, empathy for animals, and helps to develop the maturity of the child th

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Having worked in pet stores for years I can personally say there are a LOT of people out there who impulse buy animals especially rabbits around easter and they think they're going to give it a good home but they don't realize how much work it is.

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Forget about the responsible pet ownership thing for a minute, shouldn't the PARENTS be the ones to decide whether they want a pet in their home or not? OP is the boy's aunt or uncle, they have no business giving their nephew an animal to care for.

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40, while a valid point, let's remember that based off this FML, the brother in law is more than likely also the parent of the nephew. My earlier suggestion would still be a good lesson for both parent and child.

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It depends on the age of the child whether a bunny is a good pet idea. Dogs and cats are pretty good pets for children as long as you watch them but bunnies are very fragile creatures. I just saw a post not too long ago of how a bunny is paralyzed because the parents thought it was a good pet for a small child. Children need to have stronger pets to teach them gentleness before something they can easily hurt like a rabbit.

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#44 What's wrong with you? An animal is not a 'lesson' to teach to a parent or child, it's a living breathing being that does not deserve to be put into a household that doesn't wholeheartedly wish to care for it. If you think the brother in law in the FML is the father of the boy, do you honestly think it's a good idea to entrust someone who thinks it's funny to show a dead rabbit to a kid on easter with partial responsibility for another rabbit? Even normal parents aren't all that likely to be

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Rabbits are generally not recommended for families children. They're very fragile, and they get scared easily and ten to bite and scratch if picked up or held closely, which ends up in either hurt rabbit or hurt child. Plus they require a LOT of care and attention, so although it's a cute idea #21 is right.

so explain to your nephew that your brother in law is a jerk and he's playing a prank. I'm not an Easter Bunny person, but you don't screw with kids like that. it's up to his parents if they want to reveal that type of stuff

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It's not even just that, you don't show kids dead animals, period. It's fucking traumatizing. And to bring it in like that? The brother-in-law's fucked in the head... I'd be extremely careful having pets around a moron like him :(

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Maybe it isn't for YOU, right NOW, but it is when you're really little and are basically in love with all cute little creatures. Especially if you still don't quite understand death.

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16-- why it is not traumatizing to see a dead animal for some people (farm kids, kids that grow up hunting) it is traumatizing in that manner. This kid would have to be pretty young to believe in the Easter Bunny and be that upset over the bunny's death. That is a cruel joke that the kid's possibly dad played on him.

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#37 I grow up on an Indian Reserve. At any giving day I will and have walked outside to see torn up deer legs and fur allll over the place. I have like five neighbores who like to hunt and my dog steals their scraps. That being said children are still sensitive and fragile until something takes that away from them. I found a bird with a broken leg and asked my dad if I could keep it as a pet. And he picked up a big rock and crushed it. I was only 7, seen lots of dead things and attended fune

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I was in the 4th or 3rd grade when I saw my dead kitten lying in a box all cold and stiff, I didn't cry though. Even before that I remember my dad scooping up a dead rabbit in our garage combed over with maggots i just thought was gross..I get your point though #37

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I agree with #37. I was born and raised on a farm and have seen more dead animals than I can count. When I was 5 years old we had a doe (goat) having problems kidding. I helped pull the kid and saw my first stillborn animal. I didn't cry, I didn't scream, I didn't get upset at all. I put the kid in an empty feed bag and put it in the "bone yard" like I was taught to do with all losses. It depends on the child really. It may traumatise those that don't see it regularly, while farm kids

Oh wow that's just cruel on your brother in laws part to do that! Poor kidlet! I'd be saying the easter bunny was sleeping and will wake next year. Or anything to make the kid better

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