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  boysxrulex09  |  6

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  organismal  |  6

lol, like a six foot snake could eat a human. rabbits are about right for a six foot snake. i have a 3-4 foot snake and he's on medium to large rats op, be more careful about your snake cages. snakes are escape artists; if they find an opening they will use it. and if you dont fix it, they will use it again in a fraction of the time taken to find it the first time. i kind of feel like it's not a good idea for the neighbors to have been letting their rabbit around the yard unsupervised, either? unless it's a small yard that's incredibly secure, but if it got out, it might have been killed by a dog or something anyway.

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#16: I've owned over 60 pet snakes before (and yes, they were all well cared for, and we rescued them from horrible pet owners). A six-foot snake would not be able to kill/eat you. The only way it would kill you is if it was highly posionous, and in that case, it would have been crazy for the person to not de-fang them.

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  americayay  |  6

16, I don't think he's too horrible for having the snake, but he should've kept a better eye on it. It's sad, because now the snake is probably going to have to be destroyed for killing a neighbor's pet, all because of his irresponsible owner. Poor snake. Stupid OP.

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  Phillay632  |  6

#24 Agreed. OP is lucky the snake was just wrapped around the neighbor's pet rabbit, rather than the neighbor's 3 year old child playing in the sandbox.

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  luckyyyy  |  5

pure myth you could obviously control a snake that 6 ft long you need to tame them not for a week for a month or 2 but YDI for being a bad owner people like you get us bad rep

By  comadank  |  6

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  0___0  |  7

I used to let my rabbit out to run around and eat grass and shit in the front yard all day, and he was fine. I don't see the problem. But he was calm, so it's not like he just ran into other people's yards and got away. & he would come if I called his name. If I can train my rabbit to be safe outside, then other people should make sure their pets don't get out and kill their neighbors. What's funny is that my rabbit was safe every time, but he got killed when he was in his secure cage that's hard for even people to unlock. Maybe13-year-old girls that can't even handle a Siberian Husky shouldn't be "walking" them while riding on a skateboard, then letting them get loose to go into someone's yard and break open their rabbit's locked cage, and not catching it by the time it got opened, or even by the time the rabbit ran 2 blocks to get away but then faced a bloody death and animal control had to clean it up and I had to come home to a broken into cage, dog poop on my front porch, rabbit fur everywhere, and my bunny gone. >:(

By  Penrhyn  |  5

If they kept their rabbit out in the yard it would have died an early death at any rate, from predators, disease and exposure to the elements. I feel sad for the rabbit but hopefully this will teach the buns owners that they are indoor pets.

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  lettertjes  |  5

Rabbit's don't need to be indoor pets. If you give them a dry shelter with enough hay they can easily live outside as long as you live in a country with at least a temperate climate.

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  Sharrakor  |  5

I've seen a rabbit or two live in my backyard for quite a while; they're not as fragile as you make them out to be. There aren't too many predators in most backyards (but I guess it depends), and "outdoors" does not mean "rampant with disease."

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  TheLoneWolf87  |  5

Up here in Illinois we have coyotes and wolves stalking the neighborhood. Its not uncommon to see decapitated geese, duck wings, and the furry remains of wild rabbits.

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  Sharrakor  |  5

Visualizing that makes me want to nail a "Home Sweet Home" sign somewhere on my house. So it's definitely a case-by-case thing. There's nothing like that here in good ol' North Carolina, home of the sweet potater.

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  Penrhyn  |  5

@ #12, I don't think Minnesota has a temperate climate. @ #60, I've seen evidence of at least a dozen rabbits that have been taken by flying predators (Hawks) though admittedly it does depend on the region and size of the rabbit. Foxes, Wolves, Feral Cats, Coyotes, Feral Dogs etc would have no problem getting at a rabbit in a yard, even a fenced in one if they are hungry enough. And you also have to take into account the human predators, the sickos that break into peoples yards and kill pets, by ringing their necks, throwing them around the yard, kicking them to death etc etc

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  plexico  |  12

Yeah. I was going to say that my six-foot snake never gets away -- it's attached to me, heh-heh-heh. Great, er, I mean, dirty minds think alike!

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