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By FullMonty - / Saturday 15 September 2012 23:26 / United States - Milwaukee
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By  MyPetNinja  |  14

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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By  MyPetNinja  |  14

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  loloalltheway  |  23

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  GypsyRover  |  0

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  annie_nk  |  22

It was her brother and his friend though. I have no problem bring naked as a jay bird but I'd be extremely embarrassed it was my brother and his friend. Two people I would NEVER want to see me naked.

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  Rocky007  |  15

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  jmacfan1  |  16

I don't have a lock on my bathroom door. In fact the only locks in my house are on the door that goes out to the garage, the front door, and the back door. The hall bathroom and my room are the only rooms with doors anyway.

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  Feared  |  9

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  brownkity  |  3

Well a lot of houses have that rule when they have little children. The kid turns the lock and gets locked in and starts to panic and can't get out. When my little cousin was 4, we had that problem. Or they lock the door when mad that you are about to scold them, and no one can use the bathroom...or they lock it and close the door as they leave, and everyone is stuck on the outside... Just a few reasons to have a no lock rule.

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  giuby  |  18

In my house we never lock the door when we shower, so if someone slips and gets injured the rest of the family can help..I thought it was common sense..?

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  darkgodxvx  |  4

You know... they do make easily unlocked doors for inside the home. Those door knobs that have the little hole on the outside can be unlocked by pushing a suitably sized pin in it (ie a small screwdriver). Secondly, what are you peoples' doors made out of? If its a real emergency they can be easily kicked in... Even your external doors can be easily kicked in, so your indoor ones are less than a problem.

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  esines  |  9

58 - no shit, they were asking why OP didn't lock the bathroom door in the first place. If she had done that, then her little sister couldn't have walked in on her

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  JackFaire  |  11

There is a 2 year old sister in the home. If her parents are anything like mine there are no locks on the bathroom door. My younger siblings locked themselves in the bathroom once and my parents removed the doorknob with a lock and replaced it with one that didn't have one. A lot of parents do this so often you have to use the bathroom and hope for the best. I agree YDI if you have the option to lock the door and don't but if it isn't even an option then FYL.

By  TourettesGuyFTW  |  25

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  143dav  |  8

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  143dav  |  8

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  GypsyRover  |  0

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  xcarxcrashx  |  9

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  143dav  |  8

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  143dav  |  8

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  garrr  |  0

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By  hol18  |  5

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  Senseless_487  |  28

My daughter is 15 months, and already knows how to open doors. And we don't have locks on our bathroom doors. I think it's safe to assume that the two year old is able to open a bathroom door if there are no locks.

By  HiIAmKevin  |  8

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  klx125cross  |  9

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  slurshies  |  11

splashing: present participle of splash (Verb) Verb: 1: Cause (liquid) to strike or fall on something in irregular drops. 2: Make wet by doing this: "they splashed each other with water".

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