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By EllieS9311 - / Tuesday 16 February 2016 13:16 / United States - Montevallo
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By  writerchic85  |  25

Take that money spent out of any gifts/allowances he was going to get in any future holiday or birthday. Maybe that will teach him not to do something so serious.

By  Ruskiy_Cherep  |  18

Desperate times call for desperate measures

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By  Ruskiy_Cherep  |  18

Desperate times call for desperate measures

By  writerchic85  |  25

Take that money spent out of any gifts/allowances he was going to get in any future holiday or birthday. Maybe that will teach him not to do something so serious.

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  shessohighh  |  10

Well said. As someone with epilepsy, I can attest that even with insurance, the tests that they have to do are SO expensive. I'd be so pissed if my kid pulled that crap!

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  CaraMaria  |  6

I agree. Very rarely do FMLs actually piss me off, but this one does. He needs to be taught a serious lesson. It's not even all about the money he wasted. He wasted the time and resources of both the emergency department and the paramedics/EMTs that took him to the hospital. Time and resources that would have been used for people actually having a medical emergency

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  spookyjohnson  |  7

That is only a very small percentage, only like 10% of epileptics are sensitive to lights, it's called photosensitive or reflex epilepsy. There are many other triggers for an epileptic, such as being too tired, having a few drinks, or other underlying health issues. (I'm photosensitive)

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  may14th  |  26

I'm sure the doctors who went through years and years of school and training will figure it out. They usually do.

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  soactually  |  4

Not necessarily. It's pretty difficult to distinguish between certain types of seizure and faking, after the fact. Which is why getting treatment for my actual epilepsy involves a certain amount of "proving it" to various doctors, neuros, EMTs, etc. It's... not pleasant. I had one EMT practice hand IVs on me because he was convinced I was only pretending to be unresponsive and that I'd eventually give it up if I was in enough pain.

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  shessohighh  |  10

#77 you should probably find a good neurologist.. When I was diagnosed they were very patient, even though I had 3 EEGs before they finally caught it. It's not a matter of "proving it". It's to make sure they give the correct diagnosis and don't just stick you on brain altering medication without making sure they're doing the right thing.

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  zeffra13  |  28

#88 In a lot of places they just assume if you don't pass the first test you're likely faking and are rude about retesting. My ex was epileptic and had to go through all the "proving it" every couple years to re-qualify for his meds or his insurance would take them away. There are a ton of insurance scam people out there these days so I can't really blame them. :/

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  shessohighh  |  10

What!? That's insane. I've seen 3 neurologists in 3 different cities that I've lived in and NEVER had a problem with any of them. Furthermore, I don't think anyone would "fake" epilepsy, as the procedures are very uncomfortable and expensive and adjusting to the medicine is awful. Faking a seizure, yes. But faking EPILEPSY?! I find it hard to believe that happens a lot.

By  isnobodyhere  |  32

He can drop out to be an actor!

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My mother tried selling some of my things once, to "teach me a lesson" when I broke a window (I leaned against it, the ancient glass shattered) too bad the items she chose were in fact, things I'd bought myself. Turns out you can sue your parents at the age of 12, and win, when you've got receipts to prove it and your Uncle is a lawyer =P I got brand new replacements, and a bit of spending money out of the deal, and my parents never tried that bullshit again ^_^

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