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By TheNewCashierInTown - / Monday 23 May 2016 19:30 / Canada - Gatineau
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By  Bloodknight  |  22

So either you REALLY suck at your new job, and should be in no position to count/ dispense money whatsoever, or your drawer is short before your day even begins? Are you able to count the drawer yourself before you start. Someone could be pocketing money and using you as the fall guy, being new and all... Either way, be careful.

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By  Bloodknight  |  22

So either you REALLY suck at your new job, and should be in no position to count/ dispense money whatsoever, or your drawer is short before your day even begins? Are you able to count the drawer yourself before you start. Someone could be pocketing money and using you as the fall guy, being new and all... Either way, be careful.

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  mariri9206  |  32

They really shouldn't be counting out their drawer alone on their first few shifts, anyway. Someone should be there to watch over them and make sure they're counting it correctly/properly and just be there in case they have questions, or if they want someone to double check their count, in cases like this one.

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  anlong93  |  9

I used to work at McDonald's, and I had a manager who was terrible at counting drawers, so before she put me on the register, I always made her count it in front of me. Too many problems were created with other people because of her careless counting.

By  Mauskau  |  34

Are you terrible at counting? When I worked retail we didn't have set cash registers so you could have different people on there during one shift, made it difficult if money went missing. Plus we had no idea how much was supposed to be in there as there wasn't any indication. Maybe tomorrow you'll have none missing.

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  mariri9206  |  32

It's their first two shifts and there's also a chance it could be their first job, making it entirely possible they're not comfortable counting out a drawer yet. They deserve a chance. Either way, first job or not, they shouldn't be counting out a drawer on their first few shifts, anyway. Even if they did have a job that counted out registers before, it's a new job, likely new system/procedure.

By  babs22291  |  15

I run a tobacco shop, all drawers in my shop are to be counted down to $200.00 even at the end of every shift, plus I have a bill exchange drawer which always holds 660.00 in small bills and change. $200.00 is what I believe most companies start out at.

By  delichick  |  26

How do you think everything went well by the end of your 2nd day your til was short $40? Are you rushing cashing customers out? Ive worked with cash for the last 13 years and It takes a second to make sure the customer gives you enough money to pay, and youre giving the right change back. You count your til before you start? Are others using the til? Id start being super careful.

By  Mynxie  |  21

I use to work as a cashier for about 2 and a half years at 3 places, two was seasonal, and at the beginning of each shift at the till, we had to count the money in front of the manager to make sure the fresh draw had the correct amount of money. So yeah you really suck at your job.

By  krgoks  |  5

Assuming it's truly exactly $30 and $10 off, it's probably one of these issues (ordered most likely to least): 1. Hurried >> Dexterous jobs require slow and perfect practice. Speed will come. 2. Sticky Bills >> Rough up the new ones. 3. Theft >> Who else has access to it? 4. Hungry Register >> Check inside the register especially if the bills are loose. 5. Bad Math >> Doubtful

By  Lalala579121  |  27

Well then maybe you shouldn't have taken money out of it and put it in your pocket.

By  rmsutton  |  14

I worked at McDonald's for 3 years and a local grocery store for 2 years. Did they give you a fresh drawer when you clocked in? Was anyone at any time on your drawer, like when you were on lunch or in the bathroom? If so, confront them and make them pay back half of it since they were on your drawer, too. The people I worked with (specifically at McDonald's, the grocery store all cashiers pretty much had their own lane) were assholes and would slip a $20, sometimes more, into their pockets while working on someone else's drawer, knowing they would get the blame. Even getting them to pay back half of it they didn't mind because they knew they were still $10 up from before. It got to the point where I refused to let anybody else on my drawer at McDonald's because it was too frequent an occurrence. The only person I ever let give me a break without replacing my drawer first was my brother, who was the closing shift manager while I worked there.

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  rmsutton  |  14

Quick follow up: also check underneath your drawer. One day when I was closing with my brother and he was counting my drawer, he came to me, deathly pale, on a day nobody else but him shared my drawer and told me I was $100 off. I looked at him like he was crazy and asked him to use his key to open the empty drawer in the drive thru and, lo and behold, there was a crisp $100 bill sitting in the back of the drawer. We're always told to put big bills like that under the drawer, it just must've gotten shoved into the back of the drawer from all the moving. Reason he was freaked out: he shared my drawer, he would have had to pay back half of it. He had 3 kids at the time and he and his wife both worked at McDonald's - he couldn't afford to be out $50.

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