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jackroarrr Say more :
I work at a group home ... As my shift ended and my coworkers told me they needed to go home I volunteered to take the youth to the hospital and followed procedure filled out the paper work and was at work on time for my next shift I feel like a good job or thanks for not waking me up at 1130 at night and dragging me out of bed from my boss would be appropriate. Entitled no but a thanks instead of a suspension would have been nice.
By jackroarrr / Thursday 12 May 2016 17:47 / Canada - Edmonton
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By  47twixbars  |  13

Life's a bitch. Fuck her. *waits patiently for downvotes*

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  tarlax  |  11

"*waits patiently for downvotes*" You say that like you actually said anything controversial. Whew boy, your sense of self-esteem must be in the gutter.

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  harperska  |  10

#19 that law is exactly why companies have strict overtime policies. Paying employees is expensive, and paying employees overtime is even more so. If employers let employees work overtime whenever they wanted, it could bankrupt the company. OP should have handed the patient off to someone still on the clock (presumably a group home has 24 hour staffing).

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  Frid_Kun  |  7

They cannot refuse to pay him for the time he actually worked- this would be a clear breach in contract and/or employment laws. From their perspective, he demanded more money to do something his employer did not request him to do.

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  jackroarrr  |  25

I don't actually care if I got paid or not ... I did my job and went above and beyond when we didn't have the staff to cover it had I went home the youth would have been neglected and not given the medical attention they needed urgently at the time. They couldn't wait another 10 hours until there were more staff to attend to the other residents ... I didn't deserve to get in trouble .. For doing my job our policy's and procedures out line ... That the youth needed a psych evaluation... ASAP ... And to be given medical attention for their injury ...

By  Ewokhunter01  |  26

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  jackroarrr  |  25

I work at a group home ... As my shift ended and my coworkers told me they needed to go home I volunteered to take the youth to the hospital and followed procedure filled out the paper work and was at work on time for my next shift I feel like a good job or thanks for not waking me up at 1130 at night and dragging me out of bed from my boss would be appropriate. Entitled no but a thanks instead of a suspension would have been nice.

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  xMaeLA  |  21

A jerk? In your head, Op sounds like a jerk because he "expected praise" for going out of his way, something he didn't have to do, to help out in a way that most others wouldn't? Hm.

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  Mynxie  |  21

OP I worked at group home with older individuals and I was made to stay 2 hours after my 12 hour shift (left at 11pm) and was only allowed to come in 30 mins later to my next shift (which was 7am the next morning). I wasn't thanked for doing the extra 2 hours nor was I gave 2 hours to come in late to get more sleep. So I completely understand where you are coming from.

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  jackroarrr  |  25

It doesn't help my boss is a unorganized scatter brain ... The teen had self harmed and need to go to the hospital as per policy and procedure for the incident my other coworkers needed to go home to their families and night shift isn't capable to transport and leave the residence to do so. What other choice did I have ? Lol Such a thankless yet rewarding job usually.

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  laurellkawes  |  27

You had an option. You could have called your supervisor for permission. My boss is also strict about OT, so we always ask permission if there's an emergency, so there's no surprise

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  Dr0n3  |  18

A mere second? This was a kid that most likely cut themselves superficially. I doubt a hospital visit was even necessary, but it was OP's employer's policy. Come down off that drama horse.

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  misaka11235  |  7

Considering it is self-harm, you should not assume it's just a superficial cut (which you don't actually know as it was not a detail that was provided). There is a chance that there might be other methods used at the same time. Slapping on a plaster doesn't help with acute hepatotoxicity from paracetamol overdose. Really, you are assuming details just to piss another commenter? Do you not have anything that remotely portrays a veneer of meaning in your pitiful life to waste your time on? Or is your cranium simply too neuron-deficient to understand that "self-harm" comprises a lot more than simply cutting?

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  PhantomKitty  |  26

35, cutting is NOT the only method of self-harm out there. Burning, choking, biting, hitting oneself to the point of bruising, pulling out one's hair, etc. are ALL considered self-harm. Don't assume that cutting was the method that the patient used, as any of those other methods could also have been severe enough to warrant taking them to the hospital.

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  toaster87  |  19

Meh it's usually policy to contact a manager or nurse in a situation like this anyways.. So I'm assuming you skipped that whole step or asked someone else to do it and they skipped it.. And I'm assuming you transported him which means it wasnt a horrible emergency since you didn't contact 911, so it kind of does fall on you for not contacting your superiors to let them know the situation and what they would have wanted done

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  sohigh10  |  30

There was policy in place. OP followed policy that is specifically in place so you do not have to call your supervisor in the middle of the night just to approve some goddamn overtime. Regardless, getting reprimanded for working overtime is ridiculous, especially if someone requires hospital attention.

By  Mathalamus  |  22

i don't think taking a client to the hospital counts as work. unless you work at a hospital or something. dunno.

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  tishtashbat  |  16

A CLIENT. Not a friend or family member. Hence, they were obviously at work, I would have guessed likely in some kind of care or health setting but as it turns out in a home for young people. If it's a client, it's work, and it was after the end of their shift but they stayed to make sure the client got the care they needed because there weren't enough staff without them.

By  frankmz  |  17

Hey op. There are more reasons than just over time. Their insurance would have gotten a heart attack if something were to have happened to you and that person because you were still on the clock. Once you're off the clock, they only care about so much. Nothing to be honest, once you're off the clock, and off company property, they don't care what you do. I admire you for going the extra mile, but there is a saying that says "No good deed goes Unpunished." Sucks huh op.

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  bonermonkey  |  31

yeah but if you read op's reply, taking the client to the hospital is part of their job and indeed in that situation was company policy, so they would have been insured so long as they were clocked in

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  CaptMacLeod  |  45

In transporting the client/patient, if OP was NOT clocked in, he would have been fired. All liability insurance his employer has would be invalid. Should he have got into an accident with said client off the clock, not only would all liability fall on him, but endangerment charges. The company would most likely be sued, leaving OP out of a job.

By  OtakuTaco  |  15

I hate the posts that are like, "I felt entitled to this outcome but got a different one. FML." YDI.

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  Xcizer  |  17

Expectations are completely different from outright entitlement. If someone stays late to bring a person to the hospital of course they would expect people to be happy. Then OP got suspended for bullshit reasons.

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