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By  rt567  |  25

I've been in therapy too, but for the ability to adjust to life right now in a wheelchair, but maybe something you mentioned reminded the therapist about something that they experienced.

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  perdix  |  26

#1, they often do. A lot of people who go into the field are there to solve their own problems first, and if they can make a living helping others, that's just icing on the cake.

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  SamCat  |  26

#1 I had a therapist in my hs days, he used to tell me how his 15y/o daughter slept around due to the bad example of his wife who was having an affair. I knew it was unprofessional of him but I felt so sorry for the dude.

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  maz95  |  26

#17, interesting to know. I never looked at it like that. #34, that was rather unprofessional of him to offload to you but I agree that it's a sad case. He must've felt pretty comfortable to be so open to you about his own struggles.

By  rt567  |  25

I've been in therapy too, but for the ability to adjust to life right now in a wheelchair, but maybe something you mentioned reminded the therapist about something that they experienced.

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  Roskosity  |  25

What is it like being in a wheelchair? What do you have to adjust that someone who has never had to use one wouldn't ever think of? I'm not trying to be insensitive, I'm just trying to see things from your perspective. I hope everything goes well for your recovery!

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  hooligyn123  |  25

I'm gonna just throw this out there... Losing mobility can be very hard to deal with, everything can easily feel like a challenge. I had a friend hit by a drunk driver and is now permanently confined to a wheelchair. The first 6 months were devastating for her as she used to like hiking to remote locations, going out dancing and the like and not being able to do so anymore was hard to handle, thankfully she has found ways to cope and still finds things she can do outdoors and had a fantastic therapist that helped her through the ensuing depressing after the accident.

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  rt567  |  25

don't worry its not insensitive at all, I'm glad you asked, well the hardest part for me is accepting the fact that right now (since Oct. 20 ) neurologist classify me as paraplegic, its difficult to come to terms that hey I cant move my legs and just get up and walk. the one word to describe it is frustrating, that's what others have said too in the rehabilitation hospital, I'm just grateful for what I do have which is movement from the waist up, which with some people they can barely balance the head with a high cervical injury. I like to look on the bright side and stay positive.

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  BellaBelle_fml  |  25

39, I'm sorry that you are having this struggle, and at such a young age. I can't imagine the frustration you have to battle everyday. But your attitude and determination makes you a rockstar! With the positive view you have on your life you can accomplish anything! You're a pretty awesome young lady in my eyes.

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  rt567  |  25

thank you guys so much =D I totally agree that no matter what situation whether it be failing a test, all the way to severe disability, attitude is everything, cause stress can make it worse. ill admit i went through these stages in this order, denial, anger,grief, frustration, acceptance, happy with who I am and who I will be. over all, positivity is key. stay beautiful everyone.

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  rt567  |  25

no its OK if you ask, if someone is curious I'd rather them ask than presume and stare at me, well I am still undiagnosed, basically, since august both my legs have been vetting weaker, more hyper sensitive, pins and needles,kind of thing, then on Oct 20th when I was laying down for an hour I couldn't move my legs at all. not even a toe. been in and out of hospitals, doctors say that I am truly paralyzed, I hate that word, well, cause its scary, I have no reflexes in feet but in knees, incontinence, hypersensitivity from the chest down, but yet they are having trouble let finding a correct diagnosis. going to mayo clinic hopefully soon to get some more answers.

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  ZeeBest86  |  25

you're an inspiration! I know some people that complain about such petty things. It makes me so angry that people cant just be greatful for what they have because they can loose it in the blink of an eye. Could what you have be ALS? (lou gherigs). I wish you all the best. You will be in my prayers.

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  g0dless  |  34

Each to their own. My therapist couldn't hold her tears back when I mentioned something that had also recently happened to her. Don't forget that people handle things differently.

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  fl0fl0_fml  |  34

I agree with the fact that they're people too...but since you have to pay them for helping you solve your problems, I think therapists should be more professional (or give you free sessions, or pay you to hear them talk about THEIR lives).

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  cradle6  |  30

It's possible but not necessarily. I had a therapist friend, and she told me that in the beginning of her career: the people's stories would keep her up at night. It does mess with you. Psychologists are not immune.

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  fl0fl0_fml  |  30

It's not always like this... My therapist had a family situation close to mine, only difference is that SHE was the stepmother, and i'm a step-daughter. So when i talked about the problems I was having with my step-mother, she almost started insulting me, saying that it's never the new wife's fault, etc... So yes, having a similar background can help, but not necessarily.

By  robotiick7  |  26

If you're into writing you can always write a book about your life and you can try to get it published. Hey, you never know it just might.my friend likes to write and he's been through a lot in his life and he put his life in a book of what happened to him and its amazing. You're story sounds really moving and touching if you made your therapist cry!

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  Danielle7994  |  29

But at the same time, the therapist needs to be professional. She can't really "break down". It seems from the tone that OP was probably like "oh brother". Sure the therapist can sympathize, but she must remember that she needs to be strong and give advice.

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  BellaBelle_fml  |  29

10, You are so right. Being in the nursing field I have had to maintain my professional composure in front of patients several times. I have wanted to break down in tears and just give them a hug. I can be supportive and comforting, but it would be crossing a professional line to cry. But I think it's somewhat healthy to have these emotions as a nurse. It reminds me why I decided to become a nurse in the first place, to help people. It also means that I have not become numb to other people's suffering. A true nurse genuinely cares for their patient's well-being. I know several nurses who view their patients as no more than just a paycheck, and that disgusts me.

By  perdix  |  37

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  perdix  |  37

#19, thanks. Me, too. I would hope that people who think FML is a place where people post their problems to have them lampooned, ridiculed and mocked would like my comment. It certainly did provide an alternate hypothesis of what made the therapist cry. Sadly, to this day, many people think of FML as an online support group . . . and something to read while eating. They get pissed when people say things that don't match their expectations.

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  lndala  |  37

Perdix, I loved your reference to the days before smartphones and thought your comment was rather amusing. It's not your fault some people have no sense of humour

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