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Car washes like that usually have valets, or people who drive your car up to the car wash. I was thinking maybe the valet rolled the window down. However, if OP left it down, totally a YDI.

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Why would a valet that works at a car wash open a window? That doesn't make any sense. It's their job to check everything is closed. Also, they do have a lot of those big signs all around telling you to close all your windows. So my guess is that OP is one of those people who ignore signs all the time and then yell at employees because "nobody told me". Entirely YDI until proven otherwise by a follow up.

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#32, I wish I had your deduction skills! You completely knew what type of person OP is and how they'd act, off of conjecture. Truly impressive, you should be a detective.

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The merits of his comment aside, "that'll learn ya" is a well known folksy expression in English regardless of whether or not it conforms to standard English grammar. Commenting on the ungrammaticality of a colloquial expression is just plain stupid.

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#5: That word. It does not mean what you think it means. You literally have no idea what literally means. You figuratively suck at figuring out figures of speech.

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Literally: in a literal manner or sense; exactly. Figuratively: by or as a figure of speech; metaphorically So that doesn't literally suck, neither does your choice of comment but, oh well!

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#28, it's people like you that get the dictionaries to add the extra definition. Why the hell would you want literally to mean metaphorically when you use literally to define a situation that is not exaggerated? Beats me, but, apparently, it's fine for you. What if I said "my grandma literally died laughing"? Did she die laughing or just laugh really hard? So if I said "you're freaking stupid, literally" am I using literally in the metaphorical sense or literal sense? Well,

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