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By bloodless / Tuesday 5 January 2016 05:17 / Canada - Grande Prairie
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  chriss2015  |  13

I've found tattoos more painful than blood tests. However that's pretty irrelevant I would honestly pass out if this happened to me. The thought of how nervous I would already be combined with the feeing of the needle moving around in your arm... I'd puke.

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  hasooon  |  24

#25 I have tried that before, now I'm a vampire. But luckily I can't be killed by wood or sunlight. I guess being a zombi has to do something with that.

By  NostalgiaFreak9  |  35

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  Lilkat39  |  5

stop being so ridiculous. file a complaint?! really?! guess what... happens all the time. all. the. time. why? because nothing is perfect, however much you would like it to be.

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Honestly, this happens even to the most competent people. Sometimes a vein that looks and feels good collapses as soon as you start to draw blood, sometimes the tip of the needle is pushed against the side wall of the vein and needs to be wriggled a bit so blood can flow through. Sticking a patient more than two or three times is a faux pas, but it sounds like OP's nurse just tried to adjust the position of the needle and frightened OP by not explaining enough.

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  littlekellilee  |  41

I've had so many blood tests and IV's in the same spot that my veins have scars. I tell the tech every time they take blood and they nod and pay no attention, then stick the needle into the scarred section and have to feel around before redoing it further down. It's nothing to do with their competency, more with their lack of edge case prediction.

By  ch00k  |  5

It happens more than you'd think. Sometimes veins collapse, sometimes you go in at slightly the wrong angle, or a little too far. You're working with a small veins, there's not much room for error. We don't like missing veins anymore than you like it.

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  Guy1009  |  15

Amen. The needle is in our arm. We feel it not you. Thank you for being concerned for us, but if you can get what you need quickly and then get the damn needle out even quicker, that be great.

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  theblondeone  |  16

In order for nurses and phlebotomists to make it to you, they have to practice many times on already trained personnel. Don't think we don't know your pain, I myself have some pretty bad horror stories with new techs.

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  ThatHorse  |  15

I think this entire comments section misread the fml. It says the nurse put the needle in, took it out, then commented "my the blood stops flowing when I take the needle out.

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