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#1 if he didn't sign a prenub, and I think his wife would have to sign one too, or the equivalent then he's gonna have to pass on a considerable amount of their wealth to her. You'll generate a lot in 10years. And if they have signed one, a divorce with one side disagreeing still takes months (some accounts stating 1-4years!). I think OPs wife is going to bring another man into her life and wait until OP divorces her, but I'm not sure on alimony procedures for cheating spouses in Australia.

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Well it's either give up half of your shit or live unhappily with your spouse I'd rather give up half my shit so I can find someone who I'll truly be happy with

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Yes, but then you're lover could pack EVERYTHING up while you're out of the house and leave you with nothing without a word, and you'd have absolutely no legal rights. I've seen it happen.

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Actually, you do have some protection in that case. It varies by jurisdiction, but many places use common law in regards to long term commitment. If two people are together long enough, under common law it is "like you are married". I have seen that apply many times, especially in cases involving children or domestic fights.

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33 - Common law marriage is disappearing quickly in a lot if areas. I know in the US only ten states have it. Personally, I think marriage offers a lot more protection as far as assets go as opposed to simply living together. Not to mention the legal benefits (taxes, inheritance, life insurance, medical insurance. Marriage even improves credit card and insurance rates!).

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#33, I think you are referring to a "common law marriage," but I think you have to be living together for a very long time, like ten years or something. In that case, yes, I believe the law applies to you the same as if you were married. So in a way you have no choice but to get married if you want to spend the rest of your life with someone. But I was referring to a situation in which common law marriage wouldn't apply. #32, Yes that would be stealing, but then the burden of proof would be with the prosecution. They'd have to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that #1) Your belongings were actually stolen rather than simply moved. With no forced entry, that's very hard to prove. They'd also have to prove.#2) Your ex girl/ boyfriend had no right to take items from his/her own home. That was just one example. Another example would be if you live in their home and your name isn't on the lease or mortgage, they can simply put your stuff outside and change the locks while you're gone. These are just some examples. My basic point is that marriage gives you certain rights and security that simply living with someone can't.

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44, I thought it was usually much longer than that. According to 38, though, only ten states have common law marriage at all. In any case, it's important to know your rights and state laws, and there are definitely legal and personal security benefits to getting married. Sure, if you don't get married, you can walk out on your partner at any time with little to no hassle, but then again your partner can also do the exact same thing to you.

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Don't Americans have some sort of 'living together' contract? Belgians have. I'm not sure which one has the best financial benefits, that or a marriage contract, but I'm pretty sure both of them makes it illegal to steal your partner's goods.

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I've never heard of a "living together contract." We do have common law marriages, in which a couple has been living together long enough to be considered legally married. Apparently, though, most states don't have common law marriage. Each state is almost like its own country and the laws can vary greatly. Anyway, I think people are getting too hung up on my "leaving and stealing your stuff" example. It happened to someone I know and that's why I immediately thought of that scenario. Obviously it would play out differently in certain jurisdictions or situations. Perhaps I should have been a little more explicit in the point I was making in my original reply, which was that if you're living with someone and you're not married, they can screw you over a lot more easily than if you were married.

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#57, Some US states have civil unions, and some are for both same-sex and opposite-sex couples. These cover many (but not all) of the areas covered by marriage, but may not be recognized by other states if the couple moves. Without civil union or common-law marriage, unmarried couples must make separate legal arrangements for everything from property to health care decisions to wills.

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She's right. It's also expensive. There's a cheap effective solution out there, but if I propose it, the shrill, tight-ass, judgmental sheep will bury it immediately. It's certainly better than enriching parasitic divorce attorneys.

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I thought he was going to suggest killing his wife and making it look like a burglary. But maybe I've just been watching too much, "Scorned: Love Kills."

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Yea, I imagine he would've used the classic Perdix suggestion of "hey just go get a prostitute!" Reminds me of the Castrol commercial: "Think with your dipstick, jimmy!"

There's a reason divorces are so expensive: they're worth it. Divorce her. Perhaps, if she remains as disengaged as she is, you can even stick her with the bill.

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