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By Never Been Arrested - / Tuesday 1 March 2016 21:44 / United States - State College
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By  Baustigt  |  40

It's okay. I'm sure the escaped prisoners hate it when they're mistaken for nurses. Doctor: "Quick, nurse! Hand me the scalpel!" Prisoner: *pulls shiv from sock*

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By  doemetoch  |  28

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  syki  |  22

I don't know why this is getting downvoted. It's unhygienic at best and actively contagious at worst for healthcare professionals to wear their uniforms outside of the hospital.

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  dafluckster  |  6

I am a nurse and that's actually not true. Also, you really think we have time at work to change our clothes - twice??? Coming in the when we leave? And I suppose we should also be required to shower while we are still at work?

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  stupidpplsuck  |  33

19 my father is a chef at let me tell you he wears his white out of the kitchen all the time and as 20 said, you don't have time to change when you get there. you barely have enough time to eat or even pee.

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  lysx84  |  24

My grandmother was nursing staff all her days - she got changed at work before and after her shift. Why? Health and hygiene reasons. I did think those were more important than timing your shift. Apparently I'm wrong.

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  graceh1211  |  20

Why is this being downvoted? They're correct. It's unhygenic and puts OP's patients at risk, however small. My mum is a Matron and if she sees any of her nurses wearing their uniforms outside of work she will not be happy at all, and they know it. It is bad practise and simply unhygenic.

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  mikuxxhatsune  |  30

My mum has a uniform but she has to change into the scrub during operations, because she works in the operating theatre. Other nurses that just watch the patients or look after then don't have to change but are required to wear the uniform.

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  Xamry14  |  10

What's the difference between carrying them around in the outside world and wearing them? Probably comes in contact with the same bacteria. Plus your more likely to catch something in a hospital than you are in the outside world. We have been stuck in a hospital room for a week and our nurses say they've never gotten sick as often as the do now that they work in health care.

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In my company the chefs have to change into their uniform when they arrive then back out when their shift is over due to strict hygiene regulations. I believe a few years back nurses had to do the same but that has changed, my aunt is a nurse and isn't required to change into her uniform when she arrives, she can just turn up in it but maybe it's different in other countries I'm not sure.

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  doemetoch  |  28

I've worked in several hospitals and I've never seen nursing staff wearing their uniform outside. As far as I know, you're supposed to come in time to change before work, then after work change and shower (yes, the hospital provides these facilities) and leave your uniform in the laundry so that it can get washed. I'm genuinely surprised this isn't common practice in all hospitals.

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  kmarie22_613e  |  22

I think this largely depends on where you work. My aunt is a nurse but all she does is sit at a desk while elderly residents sleep, and answers calls if they wake up. It's no different than when family visits in "street clothes". An ER nurse on the other hand should have stricter guidelines. And plenty of people wear scrubs and never come in physical contact with patients, like the nurse at my doctors who writes down my weight and takes notes before the doctor sees me. It's all situational.

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  yellowzinnias  |  20

I think what we have here is confusion between America and Europe/Canada. See, in the vast majority of places in the U.S., nurses have to buy their OWN uniforms. That means scrubs are kept in their home, and it would be pointless for them to carry them to work before changing into them, etc. One of my friends informs me that Canada supplies nurses' scrubs, and they generally change once they arrive at work. I'm guessing it's similar in Europe. However, since I don't think there has ever been a case of death traced back to a nurse's scrubs in the U.S., I'm pretty sure people's outrage is pretty funny.

By  flyingflies  |  36

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  flyingflies  |  36

No, I just posted early. Some time after my comment, the FML was edited. Now all who read my comment get to think "ooh look, she wasn't paying attention and acted like a smartass!"

By  Baustigt  |  40

It's okay. I'm sure the escaped prisoners hate it when they're mistaken for nurses. Doctor: "Quick, nurse! Hand me the scalpel!" Prisoner: *pulls shiv from sock*

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