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By  mikailanicole98  |  21

I could just see it now, "Today, a human tried to help me recover from a broken wing, but the idiot walked straight into a door with me still in its hands, breaking my other wing. FML"

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I could just see it now, "Today, a human tried to help me recover from a broken wing, but the idiot walked straight into a door with me still in its hands, breaking my other wing. FML"

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  badluckross  |  33

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  SneezyBear  |  33

#61, sorry to be a grammar nazi here but 'all but breaking his other wing' has a different meaning to 'breaking all but his other wing'. The phrase 'all but' in the former sentence means 'very nearly' or 'for all intents and purposes' while in the latter it means 'all except'. Repeat apology for being a grammar nazi ><

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  cmayer  |  33

Thanks 63! I've always understood the phrase but it's never been explained so clearly and that made my understanding of it that much better. :)

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  SneezyBear  |  33

You're welcome cmayer :D in fact both 'all buts' really have the same meaning ('all except') - imagine the sentence reworded as 'the bird's wing was all but broken' -> the bird's wing was battered/bruised/shattered, everything except actually broken. 'all but breaking the bird's wing' is the exact same phrase, just a re-ordering of the words. Why am I going on about this so in-depth? *flees*

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