34
By Anonymous - / Friday 13 April 2018 15:00 /
Add a comment
You must be logged in to be able to post comments!
Create my account Sign in
Top comments
Comments
By  maikeru1979  |  17

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

Reply

Dude chill out, you have no idea exactly how much snow is in the OPs area. The fact that there were a couple of accidents in the area support the fact that driving in those conditions is not the best idea.

I've seen idiots do 80 mph on black ice in Texas, but that doesn't mean I should do it too. No job is worth it if they require you to drive in on bad weather condition days.

Reply
  scorcher64  |  3

Some people live in areas that are very hilly, or in a worse case senario have a driveway that's a hill. I seen so many accidents with cars crashing into other cars, in ditches, head-on into a tree, etc., all because of black ice on hills.

Reply
  monkeytater96  |  21

Were I live it’s the ice that’s causes most recks. You can’t see it, you only know it’s there and hope your car doesn’t slide out of control. We get like two inches of snow but it melts to create a half inch of pure black ice. I’ve also worked a fast food job that remained open during a storm because “(stupid)people might show up and want food at 10pm.” After nearly having an accident getting home after being released after 6 inches of snow and ice had fallen, I quit.

Reply
  Alex Neiva  |  12

Take for example a blizzard in the middle of the night going on for hours. Snow ploughs working to clear the roads but it's not enough because within an hour it's back. 2ft of snow and and ice layer underneath. What makes anyone think they can take a day off in winter? Safety for themselves. You are allowed to refuse work if you feel it jeopardizes your safety.

Reply

There are reasons weather can prevent you from making it in to work. Blizzard. Earthquake. Tornado. Hurricane. Unless you wanna drive in all those conditions. You do you. The rest of us sane people will stay safe at home.

By  Davros  |  6

Where do you live? As someone who has lived their entire life just south of the Great Lakes it's pretty common for us to get 1 to 3 feet of lake effect snow overnight. Now if you live somewhere in the south where they just dont have the equipment or experience to deal with snow I would understand.

Loading data…