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By stupid useless criminal - / Tuesday 21 November 2017 19:00 /
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By  jbuckets_404  |  33

Comment moderated or buried due to negative votes. Show the comment

By  PhantomCrevan  |  8

I know I commented elsewhere on this, but in regards to the police not following protocol, it's pretty likely given they probably found out OP is on probation and automatically wrote everything they said off as lies. OP, if there were any cameras in the area, try to have the video pulled, and also bring up that the officers apparently didn't call medical attention to the area at being told that the child had passed out from being locked in a car- THAT I am very certain is a firable offense on the officers' part. It certainly would get them fired here.

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By  jbuckets_404  |  33

Comment moderated or buried due to negative votes. Show the comment

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  PhantomCrevan  |  8

Actually, a lot of states do in fact have allowances for breaking into a vehicle to save a child, and some have them for doing so for any living creature. It's actually more likely that the police that responded didn't follow protocol, or let appearances alter their decision, because people have been tried for criminal neglect for NOT breaking into vehicles to save children. The fact the mother wasn't arrested for leaving her child in the car- which is completely illegal where I live, unless the child is over a certain age and the car is running with working a/c- makes me think the police are at fault here. Considering that, y'know, the kid would probably be dead otherwise.

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  Callyn  |  43

He should have called the cops immediately, but breaking peoples property to save a life is the right thing to do. If OP hadn't broken the window, the kid could be dead, he should have just called the cops while waiting around instead of twiddling his thumbs. Then he would have a record of the event that didn't start with the mother's call and be in a better position.

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  Rachael Ferguson  |  10

It’s not a no-no if the purpose is to save a life...

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  SteffiTheSmile  |  25

Personally don't think he should have waited, the two mins it would have taken to call and get permission could have been too long before the child got sicker or worse

By  PhantomCrevan  |  8

I know I commented elsewhere on this, but in regards to the police not following protocol, it's pretty likely given they probably found out OP is on probation and automatically wrote everything they said off as lies. OP, if there were any cameras in the area, try to have the video pulled, and also bring up that the officers apparently didn't call medical attention to the area at being told that the child had passed out from being locked in a car- THAT I am very certain is a firable offense on the officers' part. It certainly would get them fired here.

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  neuronerd  |  28

You can't have a probation violation without first being on probation.

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  DanielleinDC  |  29

Problem is, depending on how the 911 operator prioritized it and how long it would take the police to arrive, it could have been too late. OP should have taken pictures of the child in the car, called 911, let them know he was going to smash the window to help the kid, and then done so. And then called child protective services while waiting for the police.

By  NostalgiaFreak9  |  38

You didn’t deserve this, but I think it would’ve been smart to call the cops and paramedics after saving the child, so they would know what you were doing when you smashed the windows. Plus, the dumbass wouldn’t have much of an argument there and she probably would’ve gotten what she deserves.

By  MandySkittles  |  13

It was good of you to intervene, but why in the world didn't you call the cops/an ambulance?? If a child is unconscious in a car the first thing you should've done was call - to cover your arse and make sure that the kid was actually okay. You had half an hour to get ahold of the authorities and explain why you broke the window and tell the cops what happened/get them on your side, they're usually sympathetic when a child is endangered.

By  ViviMage  |  33

I think the law states you have to wait for a reasonable amount of time before breaking the window for the cops/paramedics to arrive to save the locked in occupant. You still call the cops on the owner of the car before you break into it.

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  ViviMage  |  33

You should've called the cops ASAP when you saw this. Not have the cops called by the mother. And where are you that it's so hot you need to rescue a child/pet from the car? It's cold here on the east coast!

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  PhantomCrevan  |  8

The "reasonable amount of time" doesn't apply when the person or animal is unresponsive or in obvious distress. It's spring in the Southern Hemisphere right now, and even in the USA, including the East Coast, cars that are exposed to even mild sunlight can heat up inside extremely quickly, and heat becomes dangerous to experience for prolonged periods around 80°F. That temperature is even lower for "at risk" groups- children, the elderly, people that have disorders that interfere with temperature regulation, and people prone to dehydration. It's also likely that OP- being on probation and thus having been on the wrong side of the law before- didn't think to call the police, because- as was the case- police officers tend to take the "arrest first, ask questions way later" approach when dealing with people with criminal records. Add in that it's an unfortunately very imbedded part of American culture to be wary of the police, particularly if one is a minority, and OP was likely hoping that the police wouldn't be involved out of fear. It's also possible the OP didn't have a working cellphone at the time, and was worried that they would be mistaken for a kidnapper if they carried the kid off to find a phone they could use.

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