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There's a big, angry "debate" just waiting to kick off in response to your comment, 21. Tread carefully.

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Before I joined, I had a big, powerful dog, and a front door that was never locked. I've never come home to a dead robber and blood on my dog's muzzle, but just him being there was enough to keep my home safe. That's what having one of the most powerful militaries in the world does for you.

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I disagree. The might of the U.S Army didn't prevent 9/11, did it? Sure, the dog went chasing after the burglar. But only after he'd already made off with the goods.

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So, how about we don't get into this lengthy argument and say we did, yeah? Here, I'll do if for you. Guy 1: 'MERICA! I bleed automatic weapons and unmanned drones. Chap 2: rabble rabble rabble! Bloody Americans! You're all fat but somehow beat us in the Olympics every year. Rabble! Btw, there's terrorist attacks all around the world. Good luck in any government stopping them.

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59 - You're really going to fault the US Military for not preventing 9/11? Who possibly could have? You think if those planes had been directed at France's Eiffel Tower or India's Taj Mahal, someone magically would have foreseen it? No. We don't have superpowers. Our military does, however, do a lot for our country on a daily basis and they deserve a lot of respect and support for that. Preventing 9/11 has no correlation on how good or bad our military is.

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63 - I wasn't faulting the U.S. Army for not preventing it. I was disproving 54's claim that just having a powerful military is enough of a deterrent to stop terror attacks.

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65 - Someone burgling your house isn't a terrorist act and once again has nothing to do with the US Military considering most of them live on bases here in the US or are doing tours. I'll concede that 54's comment was rather ridiculous. Civil disputes are common enough and horrific enough that you should still lock your doors at night, no matter how safe you think you feel.

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Guys there was an issue between the departments. The guys did say they weren't interested in learning to land.. The lack of communication paved way for this!

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A terrorist act is an act which instills terror. Being burgled is terrifying. Arguably, a burglar breaking in is a terror act. But that's irrelevant. The burglar and guard dog was 54's comparison to terrorists and your army. I was merely using the same example to point out that a big, powerful deterrent isn't necessarily enough. Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to take 62's advice and walk away from this comment thread.

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It really pisses me off when someone dresses in uniform that isn't in the military our uniforms are a part of us, if you're gonna wear it you better be ready to fight for freedom, if not don't wear it regardless if you support us or not it's disrespectful.

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59, 9/11 is not the military's fault at all. It was caused by terrorists, and sadly things like that happen all over the world. That military that you trash talk is one of the only reasons you can do such a thing. Many service members are very good people who have a high chance of coming back injured or not coming back at all. And also the dog's priority is it's owner's safety.

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Someone who volunteered their life to the country wasn't worth 10 minutes? I thought Americans were supposed to be patriotic

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It's more of the soldier would get annoyed with 10 minutes, he'd appreciate the sentiment but he probably has places to go...

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149, what? No, i'm not going to harass someone for 10 minutes and call it patriotic. If anything, I'll thank them when I pass by so as not to bother them.

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Better question: Why did OP take 10 minutes to thank the man, when a simple, "Thank you for your service," or "I salute you and your service to our country," would have sufficed?

I think that I would start laughing after 10 minutes too, regardless of whether or not I was a soldier.

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Couldn't have said it better. How hard is it just to thank a person without rambling on and on about it?

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Perhaps he was an actor? Or in costume to raise money for charity? Or just said he wasn't a soldier to get rid of OP? He's not necessarily an asshole.

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maybe he wasnt wearing an actual uniform, just camo clothes? i've seen that alot. also, so what if it was? as people have said, it could have been his father's. my little brother sometimes wears my dad's medals to special occasions

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Nobody has a right to wear a uniform unless they've earned it. He was the ass hole for giving people the impression he was a soldier.

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#106, Really? A young son not allowed to wear his dad's medals (presumably with dad's or the family's permission)? This may be a family tradition of the son honoring the dad.

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If you read my comment you would see I said *ARMY UNIFORM* not just camo clothes, also not all military uniforms are camo... Again, if he was wearing an actual uniform without earning it, he's an asshole!

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Exactly... Didn't earn them... Don't wear them... I have medals from my grand father... I have never once worn them... I have my own uniform, with my own ribbons.

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Technically the Stolen Valor Act no longer exists, the Supreme Court repealed it based off of the First Amendment. That doesn't make it any less dishonorable though... To 137, it would depend. If it's a little kid who pins on medals to his shirt then people wont say much. If he's an adult and he's putting on the full uniform with medals, then it's a bit weird, and it can be insulting to people. Especially if they're awards like a Purple Heart, Bronze Star or something else. People who have earne

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With my mother's permission, I would wear her full uniform[BDU's] on days like Mother day, Veteran's etc. It was my way of honoring her service to our country and people understood it. I didn't wear her ribbons, just the rank. People would come and pay tribute and I would nod and explain that I would pass the thanks on to my mother. No harm done.

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id like to clarify, my brother is 14 atm, but he's worn them since he was about 3 or 4. he doesn't wear all my dad's medals as obviously my dad will wear some. he also pins them on the opposite side to where the Vets pin theirs, to show he's wearing someone else's medals. when i say special occasions, i mean weddings or memorial day services, not common ones like birthdays

They probably got away with it the same way actors and people at fancy dress parties do. I don't know what that way is, but there is a way.

Honestly when I'm in uniform and people come up and thank me, while I appreciate it I really don't know how to answer. You're welcome feels snobbish but thanking them for thanking you seems backward. He was probably uncomfortable and trying to get you to stop going on about it.

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I agree with you completely. I've been in 4 years, never deployed, so I always feel awkward when someone thanks me. I usually just smile and say it's a good job, and that the Army takes good care of me.

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I smile and thank them in return. It can be overwhelming, especially if you've ever gotten off a flight at Bangor or DFW.

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I just say thank you for the tax dollars. It throws them off guard every time and they get so see that we're actually human.

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In the Marines we have strict guidelines on wearing our uniform in public, as oppose the army, which honestly I disapprove of wearing utilities in public for marines have died in them, and it seems awkward that the army lets them. For us it's strictly dress attire.

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Also I can't help but smile being a deployed veteran, when I'm on a flight in coach and some boot army guy in utilities gets attention and first class treatment, funny but then again we try to avoid attention, makes me feel awkward.

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Thank you, remember when you go in, be loud, be fast, and push yourself, for in the end of the day, the pride you'll get will last you for the rest of your life, and it can't be bought or given, but earned, you'll find yourself among the great men before you who wore that uniform. It'll be tough, but it's supposed to be, for that way you'll be proud of your hard work, and don't do it for attention, do it for your family, the men next to you in it, and of course for your country. Semper Fidelis

Good 'ol assumptions! We all know what happens when you assume! That being said, ten minutes passed?? A bit excessive of you as the fool, and for him in keeping up the ruse.

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