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By ohh jeez. / Saturday 21 February 2009 02:49 / United States
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Yeah, but he has no proof the student is lying unless he has already weighed him/her himself. When it comes to personal information, you can't just claim a student is lying.

wow. everyone, chill out. 1. weight is a very personal issue. not everyone is comfortable sharing things like that, especially in a way that could have revealed it to the entire class. when I went thru health class, our prof. let us disclose anything sensitive to her, so we did the assignment in private and then received it separately. not everyone is comfortable doing it. 2. weight perception in general is a touchy subject. just because you think you are overweight doesn't mean you are, and just because you think you're at the "correct weight" doesn't mean you're too heavy. however, taking off 15 pounds was a bit much, esp. for someone who is trained to know weight and what it looks like... try taking off 5 to 10 at the most... 3. the teacher was wrong to penalize you, but cheating thru the assignment was wrong too. go to the prof and say that you weren't comfortable disclosing your weight and try to redo the assignment privately. maybe he'll be more understanding. 4. if that doesn't work, explain to his supervisor that you were uncomfortable with the subject matter and ask for them to handle the matter privately.

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Yeah, but he has no proof the student is lying unless he has already weighed him/her himself. When it comes to personal information, you can't just claim a student is lying.

So? You cheated and got caught. #10: "He shouldn't be looking at anyone closely enough to know what they weigh, that's disgusting." Are you kidding? It doesn't take that long to estimate someone's weight, especially if you're a health teacher. You don't have to undress someone with your eyes or anything like that. Calm down.

wow. everyone, chill out. 1. weight is a very personal issue. not everyone is comfortable sharing things like that, especially in a way that could have revealed it to the entire class. when I went thru health class, our prof. let us disclose anything sensitive to her, so we did the assignment in private and then received it separately. not everyone is comfortable doing it. 2. weight perception in general is a touchy subject. just because you think you are overweight doesn't mean you are, and just because you think you're at the "correct weight" doesn't mean you're too heavy. however, taking off 15 pounds was a bit much, esp. for someone who is trained to know weight and what it looks like... try taking off 5 to 10 at the most... 3. the teacher was wrong to penalize you, but cheating thru the assignment was wrong too. go to the prof and say that you weren't comfortable disclosing your weight and try to redo the assignment privately. maybe he'll be more understanding. 4. if that doesn't work, explain to his supervisor that you were uncomfortable with the subject matter and ask for them to handle the matter privately.

Yeah, sorry, guessing weight is not at easy as you think. And depending on how tall you are/how big you are, 15 pounds isn't actually a big difference in how you look.

Perhaps he knew you were lying because the weight you put couldn't possibly be true for your height and body build. You're probably somewhere between 110~150 pounds, so if you take the lowest number, subtract 15, you get a very unrealistic weight and only people located in South Asia have during a famine. If you take the highest number and subtract, then it would be obvious because it would look a lot different since you're going so much for a girl. A 150 pound girl looks very different from a 135 pounds girl. For a guy though, subtracting weight doesn't really have as profound effect mainly because girls by design have more body fat than guys (I'm not saying that as a bad thing, here) so weight increase/decrease usually increases more fat for girls than guys.

The people who are saying this teacher has to be reported and whatnot are overreacting. The teacher was NOT being immoral for calling her out, especially since he didn't do it in front of the class. I'm certainly not saying the OP was immoral, either, but between the teacher who deducted points for not doing the assignment correctly and the student who knowingly put down false information, should the teacher really be the one who's sorry for what he did? And I also agree with #7, that health class is about learning to lead a healthy lifestyle. As long as you're healthy, you learn to love whatever number your weight is, not how low that number is, so I think it would've been worse for the health teacher, who has experience with physical and mental health and visually calculating people's BMIs, to have let the student be proud of a lower, yet false and unrealistic, value.

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