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By  tygerarmy  |  35

Grandparents always have the best racist compliments. My grandpa loves everyone, but hates every race. So he always says that person is a good insert racial epithet here after they leave.

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  Mauskau  |  32

Too many negative votes, comment buried. Show the comment

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  Uglyfeet  |  23

As a counter example, listen to Paulo Cesar Baruk and Djavan... seriously, you can't TELL who IS black or white by their voices... you only have styles and characteristics that are more likely to be sung by white or black performers, hence the "black/white sounding", but without limitation or prohibition based on skin colour ;)

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  russfml  |  31

I'm not black but I agree there's a definite difference in the tone of voice, even in some cases of talking you can tell and not lingo or stereotypically speaking

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  tazmanmike2013  |  17

It's not racist to recognize difference. It's our differences that make us stronger. Just think, if we were all identical the world would be a pretty boring place. So, yes there are difference and there's nothing wrong with pointing that out, it's how it's pointed out that can either be positive or negative.

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  Uglyfeet  |  23

Maybe there is a statistical distribution of particular "tones" which are more likely to be present on blacks than whites, or something of the like... Yet, once upon a time there were Michael Jackson's voice :P

By  tygerarmy  |  35

Grandparents always have the best racist compliments. My grandpa loves everyone, but hates every race. So he always says that person is a good insert racial epithet here after they leave.

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  lestethegreat  |  10

Haha! Reminds me of my Gram. One day she said "Well, he's a nicely dressed Indian." & I told her she couldn't say that, it was rude. She comes back with "Fine, a well dressed Native American then!" Ahh, old ppl. They loose their filter as the years pass.

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  Brandi_Faith  |  31

I think a lot of it was how they were raised as well, it's like they literally don't know they're being offensive or racist in some cases. That's why they need their grandchildren to teach them, just like Op did.

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  mrs_w  |  3

You're dismissive-ness & thinking that people are being "too sensitive" to something that actually gets people killed EVERY SINGLE DAY is part of the problem. YOU ARE PART OF THE PROBLEM. "It's just a joke." "Get over it." "There are way more awful things." "You're being over dramatic." "You're being too serious."

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  Vestin  |  18

This is just a stab in the dark, but I think you're wrong. Wittgenstein has taught us that "meaning is use". If your mother isn't racist and wasn't trying to be racist, what she said wasn't "racist". It was no more racist than you quoting it.

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  lex1459  |  38

The thing is though, we have to tell her things like that. My mom very frequently says inappropriate or racist things without knowing their meaning, so we try to stop them as best we can. For example, she almost called somebody a twat because she thought it was slang for friend.

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  littleteapot  |  21

True. I thought Sam Smith was black until he performed love at an awards show. He has a more soulful voice than a lot of the bubblegum pop singers out right now.

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  ilysmfae  |  9

My mistake. I read the FML too fast. I thought OP's grandmother said that his singing voice sounded "black" like how people mistake Sam Smith to be black because of his voice :)

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