34
By beanpole / Monday 19 December 2016 19:34 / Canada - Canning
Add a comment
You must be logged in to be able to post comments!
Create my account Sign in
Top comments
Comments
Reply
  Tripartita  |  44

It is. It says, "If random events occur, people will impose their own narratives on them to distract themselves from the futile and chaotic nature of life." Erm, I mean, maybe it's a message that they're not meant to be together…

By  NeneJPhilly  |  8

Ask him to bring over soup & you guys can hang out (assuming he's good at fighting off germs). He'll see you're telling the truth & you can spend some time together.

By  karaq  |  0

why cancel a movie date due to bad weather? this raises more questions .. but in the end, if he likes you, he'll give you another shot.

Reply
  cheeeksss  |  29

Thanks for clearing that up; I was wondering the exact same thing especially since he was able to leave home. Then again, I live in Hawai'i and our definition of bad weather is a harmless drizzle.

Reply

where does it say they never got the flu vaccine...? you do know that the flu vaccine is never 100% fool-proof, right? and it appears the effectiveness/strength of it varies year by year

Reply
  almost_there44  |  23

Okay. Not going to debate about whether OP did or didn't get a shot, or if vaccines are effective or not, even though multiple studies have debunked your statements, but...

Reply
  Indianboy9321  |  25

Different strains of bacteria DO exist, and some are more resistant than others, so YES, vaccines do vary in their effectiveness. How can you disagree with the fact that a vaccine is not fool proof? If it was, it would be a panacea, not a vaccine. This is backed by both researchers, doctors and common sense.

Reply
  almost_there44  |  23

Of course vaccines are not not 100% effective, especially if you already have the virus in you. That's what I was trying to say. So even if you get a shot, if you already have the flu virus in you and come in contact with another person with the flu, chances are you will get the flu. But if you get a flu shot and don't have a dormant virus in your body, you have a less likely chance of getting the flu than someone that did not get a vaccine. People think that the flu shot gives them the flu and that is not true.

Reply

key words: "less likely to get the flu". I never argued against getting the flu shot. Better safe than sorry & I support vaccines thank you very much. I just an issue with your comment saying 'IF OP got the flu shot blah blah blah..' when you have no fucking clue if they got the flu shot or not...

Reply
  Migole  |  36

There are many different strains of the flu because it changes constantly (hence the HN terminology). The makers of the vaccine only take a guess which strains will be the most common this season, so it is absolutely and entirely possible to contract a strain the vaccine didn't include (aside from the fact that vaccines aren't 100% foolproof). Also: I don't know if this is different in the US but over here (Germany) the flu vaccine is not recommended for everyone but only those with a weakened immune system (young children, the elderly etc.) and those who work with them regularly. The reason being that a healthy immune system can usually fight off the flu, showing only minor symptoms (usually just a cold) and many people get side effects from the vaccine (the feel sick for a couple days, sometimes accompamied by a high fever and/or pain in the extremities).

Loading data…