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By Patoose / Tuesday 16 August 2016 20:54 / Canada - Montr?al
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  michaelm1290  |  23

We do these under local anesthetic - a numbing agent. Before starting we always test the sensation of the patient (since they are awake or mildly sedated) and use more local if necessary. If the patient feels anything during the procedure, we stop and immediately inject more. As a side note, more often than not patients feel pressure (as from stabilizing the toe) and not sharp pain, but mistake it as pain likely due to the nerves associated with surgery.

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  Supyo731343  |  5

it happened to me but I told them, they asked if I wanted to numb it more but I told them no, because the actual numbing procedure hurts a lot worse to me than the actual toenail removal procedure.

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  NoahK2003  |  16

33, Not necessarily during almost all surgeries performed on the limbs, a tourniquet is placed on the upper part of the limb. This is done to prevent bleeding while the surgeon works, for a clean operative site. Not just for dead or lost limbs.

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  Lalala579121  |  27

I did say "generally", meaning there are other uses for it. But regardless, it takes a lot of pressure to completely cut off circulation so my original point of saying it can't be too tight still stands.

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  AverageAvarice  |  23

Tourniquets are most often used for cutting off blood flow to healthy limbs during procedures and they can in fact be too tight. If they had a surgical tourniquet on during ingrown toenail removal, it was probably there to prevent the flow of local anesthetic from the desired area. In this case tightening it too much is not necessary. There are multiple types of tourniquets and situations in which to use them, you don't just tighten it as hard as you can and hope damage doesn't occur. I'm clearing this up for those of you whom are first aid certified, you only need to tighten the tourniquet until blood flow stops. Tighten any more and you can cause unneeded tissue death and nerve damage.

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  tido26  |  11

I had both of mine done too, but because I was already numbed on each toe, my podiatrist removed the matrix of the other two sides (that weren't ingrown) as well. The numbing is by far the worst, but getting it all taken care of while already numb was definitely worth it and haven't had an issue since.

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  Echosence  |  1

Actually podiatrists use them to prevent excess bleeding that obscures the surgical site visually and chemically. We generally use a chemical to stop the nail portion growing back.

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  AverageAvarice  |  23

Agreed, my thinking was they may have preformed a Bier's block of the leg since epi or Xylocaine usually stops bleeding enough in ingrown nail extraction without the tourniquet.

By  ifuckuprandomly  |  28

You didn't want that toe happen did you?

By  hellnosucka  |  27

IT'S NOT FROZEN! LET IT GO LET IT GOOOO!..

By  PhoenixChick  |  23

Holy shit. Did they not do the "can you feel this?" test before cutting? Damn that must have hurt. Did they at least stop before using the acid to kill the nail growth?

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I don't think they do that. the can you feel this test I mean. or I mean, when I had a small surgery done while conscious, they didn't. I told them I could still feel a bit of pain and they gave me another shot but the shit kicks in quick, not like how a dentist's stuff does. it might be that they rely on the patient to let them know so they can numb it more? idk, I've only had one op awake and it wasn't this kind, so that's just a wild guess. it definitely sucks to feel it tho.

By  stormy0307  |  11

I had that exact thing done two days ago. Though I had enough local anesthetic that I didn't feel a thing. Also it's not sore at all now unless I poke it.

By  kiki1705  |  20

Because mine were infected, doctor told me that I might scream a bit when he starts cutting....thank god the local anesthesia worked well and I didn't feel a thing. But once you're through with the surgery and healing it will be good! Fingers crossed for you!

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