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Wedding guests often don't plan to stay too long because they feel the newlyweds will want some alone time together. At least they came out for your special day, and you got to see them and then spend some time with your new spouse!

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That is so true, even family doesn't want to be there all day. Typically the out of town family will stay longer or an evening wedding people will stay a little longer.

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I think it must be different in each country, in the UK i've definitely always found weddings to be an all day event. I actually think some people would be offended if guests were to leave after only 4 hours!

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@26: Badly is the more appropriate form for this context. It's somewhat archaic, but more grammatically correct when referring to feelings. Try picking up a dictionary every once in a while, particularly if you're going to attempt to correct someone on matters you clearly know nothing of.

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Actually, "bad" is an adjective and "badly" is an adverb. In this context, you're telling OP that her feelings should not be described as "bad". Bad describes the feeling (noun) where as "badly" would describe a verb. So the correct form is actually "Don't feel too bad". However, if you want to use the form "badly" to describe a verb, then you could say "Don't feel too badly effected".

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In case I failed at effectively conveying my two cents, let me reiterate: Verbs being used descriptively (in your context, "feel" is not active because you're not applying the sense in a physical manner i.e "I feel bad having said that" vs "She feels badly since she burned her fingers") always use the adjective, but verbs being used actively use an adverb.

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I feel it depends on the culture of those you invite. My family is Macedonian. Wedding days start at 6am and end at 3am the next day. A lot of dancing is involved. I wouldn't expect that of most first world countries, however.

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@41/42: Do you not know that 'badly' is a word that is both an adjective AND an adverb? The differentiation arises from the sentence structure. A great many words can be multiple parts of speech. Very few words are solely an adjective or adverb. I reiterate, crack open a dictionary every once in a while. It helps prevent downvotes, particularly when one attempts to be pompous.

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I could honestly care less about being downvoted. But generally the correct sentence structure regarding your context would be "bad". I guess "badly" is appropriate, but it's one of those gray areas where it can be right but can be wrong... especially if it takes both forms of an adverb AND an adjective. I guess I should start studying my dictionary, as I apparently haven't a single clue about the English language. I'm an emobidment of ignorance, it seems.

Wedding guests often don't plan to stay too long because they feel the newlyweds will want some alone time together. At least they came out for your special day, and you got to see them and then spend some time with your new spouse!

By  species4872

They all needed to get their carpets cleaned, or buy a dog.

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Weddings are awesome. Especially your own. All the people you love the most are in one place at one time. And you get to share those moments with your new spouse! Who wouldn't want to revel in that?

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Personally, four hours seems very little to me, as I rarely spend less than 4 hrs with my friends on a regular hang-out day, let alone a wedding. It's not that I'm not interested in the marriage and honeymoon, but more that I'm so happy I want to share my joy and celebrate with everyone I love. However there are ppl who'd enjoy a 4-hour wedding so maybe her guests were trying to be considerate. Or maybe OP wasn't clear how long the wedding was, so they left thinking it was over. I guess I'm just saying, the preferred length of a wedding depends on the person and it's too bad that wasn't what OP wanted.

Not sure about other locations but in the UK a wedding is most definitely an all day affair! You arrive at the venue around 10am, mingle for a while, have the ceremony, mingle some more, have the wedding breakfast, the speeches etc then down to have fun, dance, chat then usually a buffet in the evening before everyone leaves late at night! Wasn't aware this was done differently in other places.

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This was in the US. Not an all day affair here. Daytime weddings are unfit 4ish hours, evening weddings maybe 6 hours, with guests dwindling down towards the end.

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Im from the UK and every wedding i've been to has been an all day affair. Usually i've found people arrive around midday rather than 10am, the ceremony is around 1pm, then you've got the meal, the toasts, the cake, usually a DJ and an evening buffet, but typically people don't start leaving until at least 10pm. I've genuinely never heard of a wedding only lasting 4 hours.

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Being from the UK, I don't know if that's just something that folks in your part of it do but that is far too long. Usually they start at 1-2 pm and last til 10ish or whenever they're too drunk to move and believe that the cardboard circles from party poppers are pound coins! my wedding started at 3pm so that folks could eat before and not spend too long between meals.

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blimey, some of you are incredibly rude on here! I said in the UK they tend to be an all day affair. I don't know what happens in other countries so can't comment. I'm 19 so not married just yet (lol!) so no this isn't based on my wedding, this is based on the 10+ weddings I've been to in my lifetime! Only possibly one of them has been a shorter day and I'm pretty sure it was the only church wedding! Anyway, just my two pence and I don't think I should be told off for that :)

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I'm in the UK and tbh, that sounds like a spot on description of every wedding I've been too. There will of course be exceptions, but I think that probably is the usual UK wedding. Maybe starting a bit later sometimes, but still that general set up and late finish.

Usually brides are more excited to say 'I do', spend time with their spouse, act crazy with an excuse and go on a honey moon than to spend time with their family. Besides if you wanted them to stay longer shouldn't you have planned activities and note them beforehand?

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